Author Topic: JOHN LEGEND....  (Read 9610 times)

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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JOHN LEGEND....
« on: September 28, 2010, 07:49:41 pm »
SIT DOWN AND SHUT YOUR DUMB ASS UP.

I've seen this idiot on NBC's pro charter school farce focus on education. I gave him the benefit of the doubt even though the man has never been an educator in any capacity.

The benefit ended tonight.

I watched this idiot speak out of complete ignorance while supporting Michelle Rhee, a woman who has done nothing but demonize teachers in America. Even more, in her arrogance she has marginalized parental involvement in school reform.

THIS is the individual this fool was praising out of complete ignorance. And I use the word ignorance in the most insulting way possible. I am sure Mr. Legend never spoke with a SINGLE DC parent or educator about the impact this lowlife corporate shill has had on their lives.

Here is a suggestion to John Legend.

When you are called up to be a Black prop on a platform in which you have NO expertise or experience, just say no!

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2010, 06:23:39 am »
I respectfully disagree. I'm glad to see Mr. Legend getting involved. He is putting in his money and his time. And he is focusing attention on one of the most important issues facing the country. Public education can be an empowering or a polarizing force in the nation.

We know the very notion of charter schools make you see red but in all honesty, it is a nuanced issue, not simply right and wrong. Case in point, Michelle Rhee is a controversial figure with strong opposition and strong support.

We have discussed education policy elsewhere on the forum but I think it's clear that significant education reform is desperately needed. The discussion on how best to fix things is complex and involved but there's no question in my mind that standing pat is a losing hand.
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."

Offline Vic Vega

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2010, 07:17:07 am »
Some background for those who have NO idea what J.S. and Curt are referring to-

From the Philly Inquirer. Com:

Quote
IT WOULD BE difficult to come up with a better spokesman for the documentary "Waiting for 'Superman' " than music star (and Penn alum) John Legend.

Handsome, smooth, articulate and with a social conscience, Legend, whose new album with the Roots, "Wake Up!," dropped last week, was at the Toronto International Film Festival earlier this month to discuss the film and the importance of education.

The 31-year-old, six-time Grammy winner grew up in Springfield, Ohio, where his parents were "very intensely focused on my being educated," he said in a suite at Toronto's Fairmont Royal York Hotel. "They actually home-schooled me for a bit and I was reading at a very young age."

Enrolling in public school when his parents got divorced, Legend found himself ahead of his classmates.

"Being ahead you get treated differently because you get tracked with the other smart kids, you get the best teachers," he said. "The public schools that were like mine invest their best resources in their top students. I was in all the advanced classes and all of my advanced class teachers were really good, really compelling, really passionate about what they were doing. I think they were excited that they got to teach the best kids - but they were probably teaching the best kids because they were the best teachers.

"So all of us did pretty well that were on that track - we went to college and graduated. But the vast majority of our school probably didn't finish college. Now our school is officially listed as a 'dropout factory' [a term widely discussed in the film]. The cutoff for that is 40 percent or more don't graduate on time from high school.

"So I went to a dropout factory but I was in an isolated environment in that dropout factory."

And that isolated environment, which began with concerned parents, got Legend to an Ivy League university. Legend's story, however, is the rare exception.

That's why "Waiting for 'Superman' " is so important to him, he said. "I want as many people as possible to see it. I want voters and politicians to see it because I think it's very powerful, very emotional and very topical. [Education reform] is an issue that is critically important for the country and the film's treatment of the issue is really moving and it will inspire discussion and, hopefully, it will inspire action."


http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/103829504.html

Legend goes on to sing the praises of the Waiting For Superman" movie.

I may have mentioned it before but it bears repeating: Charters at bottom are a place for motivated parents to go to get thier kids away from
everybody's else's "ignorant ghetto ass kids". So for the folks that actually managed to get thier kids IN the charter it probably works fine. For them. They ain't caring about anything else. I can see that.

Also, in places like Harlem where you have a class of owners who only want to see thier property value rise by any means necessary, having a charter nearby is seen as an amenity that can increase the value of your property. They can't build enough Charters for that crowd. And if they can manage to evict some project folks while they are it it so much the better.

Half of what going on with this stuff has very little to do with education, if you ask me.

Offline JLI Jesse

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2010, 09:50:38 am »
I watched this idiot speak out of complete ignorance while supporting Michelle Rhee, a woman who has done nothing but demonize teachers in America. Even more, in her arrogance she has marginalized parental involvement in school reform.


In a good mood today?

Michelle Rhee resigns as D.C. schools chancellor

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2010, 03:09:20 pm »
I watched this idiot speak out of complete ignorance while supporting Michelle Rhee, a woman who has done nothing but demonize teachers in America. Even more, in her arrogance she has marginalized parental involvement in school reform.


In a good mood today?

Michelle Rhee resigns as D.C. schools chancellor



* Turns up GOTTA GIVE IT UP*

 8) 8) 8) 8)

This is great news and I don't want to seem greedy BUT, I would much rather she was FIRED in the same manner that she did scores of educators.

Now to get the people of NYC to do the same to Joel Klein!

Offline Hypestyle

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2010, 03:35:30 pm »
slightly related--
the current Emegency Financial Manager overseeing most operations in Detroit's public schools, has come up with a proposal that has divided local education professionals and politicians..  It asks state government to forgive the district's debt ($300+ million) in exchange for complete restructuring.. a 'plan B' proposal suggests closing dozens of schools and drastically increasing average class sizes..

http://www.metrotimes.com/news/the-big-deal-1.1047662
http://tinyurl.com/27s5oxn
« Last Edit: October 17, 2010, 03:37:01 pm by Hypestyle »
Be Kind to Someone Today.

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2010, 07:15:43 pm »
slightly related--
the current Emegency Financial Manager overseeing most operations in Detroit's public schools, has come up with a proposal that has divided local education professionals and politicians..  It asks state government to forgive the district's debt ($300+ million) in exchange for complete restructuring.. a 'plan B' proposal suggests closing dozens of schools and drastically increasing average class sizes..

http://www.metrotimes.com/news/the-big-deal-1.1047662
http://tinyurl.com/27s5oxn



FIGHT IT, HYPE!

Offline Kristopher

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2010, 11:21:21 am »
I watched this idiot speak out of complete ignorance while supporting Michelle Rhee, a woman who has done nothing but demonize teachers in America. Even more, in her arrogance she has marginalized parental involvement in school reform.


In a good mood today?

Michelle Rhee resigns as D.C. schools chancellor


Hooray! Schools in the District can go back to the way they used to be.




Glad my girls go to school in Howard County, MD

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2010, 05:42:57 pm »
I watched this idiot speak out of complete ignorance while supporting Michelle Rhee, a woman who has done nothing but demonize teachers in America. Even more, in her arrogance she has marginalized parental involvement in school reform.


In a good mood today?

Michelle Rhee resigns as D.C. schools chancellor


Hooray! Schools in the District can go back to the way they used to be.



So you believe the corporate shill that is Michelle Rhee is the only one capable of substantive school reform in D.C.?

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2010, 09:26:30 pm »
I watched this idiot speak out of complete ignorance while supporting Michelle Rhee, a woman who has done nothing but demonize teachers in America. Even more, in her arrogance she has marginalized parental involvement in school reform.


In a good mood today?

Michelle Rhee resigns as D.C. schools chancellor


Hooray! Schools in the District can go back to the way they used to be.



So you believe the corporate shill that is Michelle Rhee is the only one capable of substantive school reform in D.C.?


When you look at the history of reform of school systems, most well intentioned change agents get their butts kicked.  So when a Michelle Rhee actually makes some headway in making systemic change, and gets punished for it.   So the message is don't try and make radical change, because the status quo that will always fight to maintain itself, right or wrong. 

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2010, 05:45:17 am »
Reformers get shot. Ask Stringer Bell.
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2010, 02:55:52 pm »
I watched this idiot speak out of complete ignorance while supporting Michelle Rhee, a woman who has done nothing but demonize teachers in America. Even more, in her arrogance she has marginalized parental involvement in school reform.


In a good mood today?

Michelle Rhee resigns as D.C. schools chancellor


Hooray! Schools in the District can go back to the way they used to be.



So you believe the corporate shill that is Michelle Rhee is the only one capable of substantive school reform in D.C.?


When you look at the history of reform of school systems, most well intentioned change agents get their butts kicked.  So when a Michelle Rhee actually makes some headway in making systemic change, and gets punished for it.   So the message is don't try and make radical change, because the status quo that will always fight to maintain itself, right or wrong. 


Are you equating "Systemic change" with demonizing teachers, marginalizing parents, and selling out the students for corporate interests?

That "Woman" did absolutely NOTHING to improve the lives of children in D.C.!

I've been conversing with some D.C. parents on some Ed sites and they are overjoyed that the demagogue opportunist that is Michelle Rhee has been ousted.

Real reform comes from actual educators not a pro-privitization opportunist like Rhee.

A lot of these other predators are getting shut down as well. The Broad endorsed fraud in Philadelphia is on the way out too.

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2010, 03:05:17 pm »
Could we possibly have a discussion about school reform in DC and elsewhere? With facts, goals, beliefs, lines of argument, stuff like that instead of dismissive insults?

Michelle Rhee has been a divisive figure in DC but she is not without her supporters. How about a reasoned discussion on her initiatives that might shed some light on why you feel so strongly? I, among others, would be interested.
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2010, 03:06:54 pm »
Reformers get shot. Ask Stringer Bell.

Rhee QUIT. Stringer was taken out.

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2010, 03:08:59 pm »
How to fix our schools: A manifesto by Joel Klein, Michelle Rhee and other education leaders
Sunday, October 10, 2010

Joel Klein, chancellor, New York City Department of Education; Michelle Rhee, chancellor, District of Columbia Public Schools; Peter C. Gorman, superintendent, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (N.C.); Ron Huberman, chief executive, Chicago Public Schools; Carol R. Johnson, superintendent, Boston Public Schools; Andrés A. Alonso, chief executive, Baltimore City Public Schools; Tom Boasberg, superintendent, Denver Public Schools; Arlene C. Ackerman, superintendent of schools, the School District of Philadelphia; William R. Hite Jr., superintendent, Prince George's County Public Schools; Jean-Claude Brizard, superintendent of schools, Rochester City School District (N.Y.); José M. Torres, superintendent, Illinois School District U-46; J. Wm. Covington, superintendent, Kansas City, Missouri School District; Terry B. Grier, superintendent of schools, Houston Independent School District; Paul Vallas, superintendent, New Orleans Recovery School District; Eugene White, superintendent, Indianapolis Public Schools; LaVonne Sheffield, superintendent of Rockford Public Schools (Illinois)

As educators, superintendents, chief executives and chancellors responsible for educating nearly 2 1/2 million students in America, we know that the task of reforming the country's public schools begins with us. It is our obligation to enhance the personal growth and academic achievement of our students, and we must be accountable for how our schools perform.

All of us have taken steps to move our students forward, and the Obama administration's Race to the Top program has been the catalyst for more reforms than we have seen in decades. But those reforms are still outpaced and outsized by the crisis in public education.

Fortunately, the public, and our leaders in government, are finally paying attention. The "Waiting for 'Superman' " documentary, the defeat of D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg's $100 million gift to Newark's public schools, and a tidal wave of media attention have helped spark a national debate and presented us with an extraordinary opportunity.

But the transformative changes needed to truly prepare our kids for the 21st-century global economy simply will not happen unless we first shed some of the entrenched practices that have held back our education system, practices that have long favored adults, not children. These practices are wrong, and they have to end now.

It's time for all of the adults -- superintendents, educators, elected officials, labor unions and parents alike -- to start acting like we are responsible for the future of our children. Because right now, across the country, kids are stuck in failing schools, just waiting for us to do something.

So, where do we start? With the basics. As President Obama has emphasized, the single most important factor determining whether students succeed in school is not the color of their skin or their ZIP code or even their parents' income -- it is the quality of their teacher.

Yet, for too long, we have let teacher hiring and retention be determined by archaic rules involving seniority and academic credentials. The widespread policy of "last in, first out" (the teacher with the least seniority is the first to go when cuts have to be made) makes it harder to hold on to new, enthusiastic educators and ignores the one thing that should matter most: performance.

A 7-year-old girl won't make it to college someday because her teacher has two decades of experience or a master's degree -- she will make it to college if her teacher is effective and engaging and compels her to reach for success. By contrast, a poorly performing teacher can hold back hundreds, maybe thousands, of students over the course of a career. Each day that we ignore this reality is precious time lost for children preparing for the challenges of adulthood.

The glacial process for removing an incompetent teacher -- and our discomfort as a society with criticizing anyone who chooses this noble and difficult profession -- has left our school districts impotent and, worse, has robbed millions of children of a real future.

There isn't a business in America that would survive if it couldn't make personnel decisions based on performance. That is why everything we use in assessing teachers must be linked to their effectiveness in the classroom and focused on increasing student achievement.

District leaders also need the authority to use financial incentives to attract and retain the best teachers. When teachers are highly effective -- measured in significant part by how well students are doing academically -- or are willing to take a job in a tough school or in a hard-to-staff subject area such as advanced math or science, we should be able to pay them more. Important initiatives, such as the federal Teacher Incentive Fund, are helping bring great educators to struggling communities, but we have to change the rules to professionalize teaching.

Let's stop ignoring basic economic principles of supply and demand and focus on how we can establish a performance-driven culture in every American school -- a culture that rewards excellence, elevates the status of teachers and is positioned to help as many students as possible beat the odds. We need the best teacher for every child, and the best principal for every school. Of course, we must also do a better job of providing meaningful training for teachers who seek to improve, but let's stop pretending that everyone who goes into the classroom has the ability and temperament to lift our children to excellence.

Even the best teachers -- those who possess such skills -- face stiff challenges in meeting the diverse needs of their students. A single elementary- or middle-school classroom can contain, for instance, students who read on two or three different grade levels, and that range grows even wider as students move into high school. Is it reasonable to expect a teacher to address all the needs of 25 or 30 students when some are reading on a fourth-grade level and others are ready for Tolstoy? We must equip educators with the best technology available to make instruction more effective and efficient. By better using technology to collect data on student learning and shape individualized instruction, we can help transform our classrooms and lessen the burden on teachers' time.

To make this transformation work, we must also eliminate arcane rules such as "seat time," which requires a student to spend a specific amount of time in a classroom with a teacher rather than taking advantage of online lessons and other programs.

Just as we must give teachers and schools the capability and flexibility to meet the needs of students, we must give parents a better portfolio of school choices. That starts with having the courage to replace or substantially restructure persistently low-performing schools that continuously fail our students. Closing a neighborhood school -- whether it's in Southeast D.C., Harlem, Denver or Chicago -- is a difficult decision that can be very emotional for a community. But no one ever said leadership is easy.

We also must make charter schools a truly viable option. If all of our neighborhood schools were great, we wouldn't be facing this crisis. But our children need great schools now -- whether district-run public schools or public charter schools serving all students -- and we shouldn't limit the numbers of one form at the expense of the other. Excellence must be our only criteria for evaluating our schools.

For the wealthiest among us, the crisis in public education may still seem like someone else's problem, because those families can afford to choose something better for their kids. But it's a problem for all of us -- until we fix our schools, we will never fix the nation's broader economic problems. Until we fix our schools, the gap between the haves and the have-nots will only grow wider and the United States will fall further behind the rest of the industrialized world in education, rendering the American dream a distant, elusive memory.

*The underlined passages were highlighted in the print version of the paper in the Sunday Outlook section.

And....go!
Agree, disagree, question, wonder, etc. But be specific and constructive. I think we all want better schools. How do we get them?
« Last Edit: October 21, 2010, 03:16:31 pm by Curtis Metcalf »
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."