Author Topic: KKK Welcomes Hispanics, Blacks, Gays, Jews In Effort To Rebrand Organization  (Read 5287 times)

Offline Marvelous

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"2. IF YOU DON'T READ THE BOOK BUT ARE WILLING TO ARGUE ABOUT IT EITHER YOU ARE:
a) An idiot who doesn't know what he's talking about.
b) A liar who is a fan who can't admit it to himself or others."

Offline JRCarter

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Offline Battle

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Why is this a surprise to you, JRCarter??

It's well known that Jews were down with that terrorist group for the longest time...  Come to my state and you'll see what um talkin' 'bout.

Blacks & Hispanics had been pawns of them since the inception of this country.

Gays are everywhere... even in that terrorist group.

Offline Lion

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Why is this a surprise to you, JRCarter??

It's well known that Jews were down with that terrorist group for the longest time... Come to my state and you'll see what um talkin' 'bout.

Blacks & Hispanics had been pawns of them since the inception of this country.

Gays are everywhere... even in that terrorist group.



Battle, I love you, but that right there is some ignorant sh*t.

Offline Battle

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Why is this a surprise to you, JRCarter??

It's well known that Jews were down with that terrorist group for the longest time... Come to my state and you'll see what um talkin' 'bout.

Blacks & Hispanics had been pawns of them since the inception of this country.

Gays are everywhere... even in that terrorist group.



Battle, I love you, but that right there is some ignorant sh*t.






Offline Lion

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Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Offline Battle

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Battle, I love you, but that right there is some ignorant sh*t.



It's not about me. 
I posted that image to posit the question:

Are you afraid of an American terrorist group, or not?

Offline Battle

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O.K. ... Lion, I want to show you something...



1. Go to Google Maps and inside the search field type:

South of the Border, SC


2. After the search completes, tell me what you see.

Offline Battle

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Here, let me help you with that, Lion.  :)

After the search completes, this is what you should see:


Take a good look at the darkened area plot of land on the map. 


To be continued...

Offline Battle

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O.K.... Let's zoom in a bit closer, Lion...


This is a sizable chunk of land my family used to own.  We have more but this is a huge chunk that was taken from us.


After Emancipation, my family consisted of African-Americans who earned their '40 acres & a mule' for many generations and plowed their way into middle-class status.  Fast forward to the late 1950s and the early 1960s, The Civil Rights movement was in full swing in South Carolina, at that time, a white family came into town pretending to be 'down with the Civil Rights cause' when they were really there to seize land from vulnerable Black people subjugated by jim crow.

Mind you, this seizure of land happened right at the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement under the cover of all the confusion that was happening.  The kkk controlled all the municipalities within all the little towns inside South Carolina. This white family obtained other people's property by manipulating political strings in my local town by snatching Black people's properties without challenge,  leaving my family in poverty and theirs into prosperity.

That white family was Jewish and their name was sheafer.

The sheafer family had to find a way to generate income on this stolen property; exploiting the imagery of African-Americans would make them too obvious, so they choose another minority group to screw over...

---Mexicans!







The entire property was turned into a Mexican theme park of some sort, stocking the shelves inside the gift shops of some of the most unflattering, the most racist depictions of Mexican merchandise known to Americans surrounding this state.  Let's keep it real: This Jewish family exploited the shameful imagery of Mexicans for profit and they red-lined African-Americans to acquire land for over 50 yearsUNCONSTITUTIONAL!

This jewish family became multi-millionaires.  My family has less than a fraction of what we owned.  The Mexicans routinely depicted in the offensive merchandise don't get sh!t.


Isn't it ironic that in Ava DuVernay's film "Selma", that there was some criticism that a Jewish rabbi was not featured as one of the supporters who rallied to march for Civil Rights...?  I'm beginning to understand why.


See?

Another observation: In Marion Industrial Park, South Carolina, for some strange reason the Israeli flag flies next to the United States flag... of equal height and scale but when the Prime Minister of Israel, netanyahu,  was re-elected months ago, the Israeli flag was lowered and in its place, another Israeli flag was erected twice the size of the United States flag! 

What does that action tell you?
Israel is supposed to be an ally of the U.S.!  In fact, we practically founded Israel!!!   Why is their flag bigger than ours??? ...on our soil???    By the way, Marion is where the late State Senator Pinckney was laid to rest, but I digress...


I'm indifferent when controversy surrounds Jewish people because, in my experience with them, they are no different than any other white people. How do I know this?  By virtue of my merest example. Ever notice when anyone ever says anything in protest to what they are doing, there are cries of, "Anti-Semite!!!"  or "Socialist!!!"  and what's the other one...?,

"Communist!!!"

What in the world does that mean to me, one whose family has been victimized by a Jewish family?  Those accusations are nothing but a ruse to me.
So whenever I see people falling over themselves to jump to the defense of Jews, it amuses me because I know deep down in my gut, they are secretly laughing at you.  As history has shown us, it is easier to hide your intentions behind a religion than behind the color of your skin.

As I've written before, It's not about me.

This is about protecting the middle-class and why it is so important. If there is no middle-class, you can never ever, ever, ever, pull out of poverty.  Ever.
This is why supporting Hillary Clinton is crucial to the 2016 presidential elections because she is that person who will champion for the middle-class and any other concern anyone has.



Protect the middle-class, at all costs, or else you (and anyone else) will lose everything you worked so hard for to foreigners, Lion.

Offline Battle

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"What goes up, must come down..."
Blood, Sweat & Tears - "Spinning Wheel"


Disappearing Act

Visted Marion County Industrial Park, South Carolina today and noticed that there was a empty flagpole next to the United States flag.


Much like Tom Brady's ego in the deflate-gate debacle, so is the lowering of the oversized Israeli flag to be corrected in Marion County Industrial Park.


We lead.  They follow.  That's how 1st world leadership works!  8)



Should be interesting what size flag goes up next.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2017, 06:23:46 pm by Battle »

Offline Battle

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Wednesday, 14th April  Twenty One
A Black family's beach property in California was taken during the Jim Crow era. The county is now giving it back, and it's worth millions
by Alexandra Meeks







(Los Angeles, California) — A century ago, a Black couple owned a beach resort in Manhattan Beach -- a Southern California town known for its scenic expanse.

An inviting soulful energy and the songs of Black entertainers radiated throughout the corridors of the dance hall and lodge.

But the music and good times would not last due to the strict racial segregation that dominated American life then.

Harassment from white neighbors and the domestic terrorist group known as ku klux klan tore away at the dreams of owners Charles and Willa Bruce.

The final blow came in 1924 when the city took the property through eminent domain and paid the couple a fraction of what they asked for.

The city wanted the land for a park.

The Bruces left and died just five years later.

Now, there's a move afoot to provide justice to their descendants.

Los Angeles County officials on Friday said they are working with state lawmakers on legislation that would return the property -- worth perhaps $75 million -- to the family.

"The Bruces had their California dream stolen from them," said county Supervisor Janice Hahn.

"Generations of their descendants ... almost certainly would have been millionaires if they had been able to keep their property and their successful business."

For a short time, Bruce's Beach offered Black families a place to enjoy the rich taste of California life.

Most importantly, it renewed their feelings of hope and unity.

The couple purchased the land for $1,225 in 1912, and built several facilities, including a cafe and changing rooms.

Some White neighbors resented the Black beachgoers and the popularity of the resort, a Bruce family spokesperson told CNN.

white supremacists and klan members posted "no trespassing' signs" and slashed tires so Black families would avoid the area.

The domestic terrorist group known as kkk attempted to set the property on fire and succeeded in burning down a local Black family's home nearby, county officials said.

Hahn told reporters that when scare tactics didn't work, Manhattan Beach declared eminent domain in 1924.

The couple eventually were paid about $14,125.

The city left the land vacant for several decades after it took ownership in 1929.

Today, the property is now a park with a lawn, parking lot and a lifeguard training facility.

It no longer belongs to Manhattan Beach.

The property was transferred to the state and to Los Angeles County in 1995.

Duane Yellow Feather Shepard at the site where members of his family ran a thriving beachfront resort that was seized by eminent domain nearly a century ago.

City officials have acknowledged and condemned what happened, though they stopped short of an apology.

"The Manhattan Beach of today is not the Manhattan Beach of one hundred years ago," the City Council recently said.

"The community and population of the City of Manhattan Beach are loving, tolerant and welcoming to all. We reject racism, hate, intolerance and exclusion. Today's residents are not responsible for the actions of others 100 years ago."

The upscale city's population today is less than 1% Black.

Losing Bruce's Beach was devastating for the family because they struggled to buy beachfront property elsewhere.

As a result, Charles and Willa Bruce moved to South Los Angeles and became laborers, said family spokesperson Duane Shepard.

They suffered "physical, mental, social and emotional stress" and died within five years after leaving Manhattan Beach, he said.

Giving the land back to the Bruce descendants will require state action.

A bill will be introduced this week.

The law essentially will make the Bruce's property exempt from restrictions that limit the county's ability to transfer the property with ease.

With Gov. Gavin Newsom's approval, the transfer process could be solidified by the end of the year.

Although the bill is not expected to face much opposition at the legislative level, it has been met with resistance from some in the neighborhood.

One person who did not give her name expressed her concerns at the county's news conference on Friday.

The Bruce's Beach plaque is at the top of a hill, with the lifeguard building below.

"I've been lucky enough to live in this beautiful spot for over 50 years," the neighbor said with frustration.

"I've never been discriminated against by this community, but it hurts me that the people here are trying to spoil what we have here."

The comments were met with pushback from numerous individuals.

"We love it just as much as you do," said Shepard, the spokesman for Bruce descendants.

"After the family was railroaded out of town, they lived in Los Angeles destitute and so therefore, these people who did this to my family need to rectify it by any means, including apologize."

As Los Angeles County takes steps to position itself on the right side of history, the descendants of the Bruces are positioning themselves for a life-changing sum of money.

The two lots are worth approximately $75 million in total, officials confirmed to CNN.

The houses directly next to the property have hefty price tags of around $7 million each.

One option the family is considering is leasing the land back to the county.

If they go this route, the descendants would be landlords and the county would pay rent to use the property to maintain the existing park and lifeguard facility, for example.

The Bruce family is weighing an offer to accept an outright payout from the county, the family spokesperson told CNN.

Details of that specific amount have not been disclosed.

The family also has the option to simply reclaim the property and do as they wish with developing plans, a move that would require various steps to achieve local officials' approval.

"I am hopeful that the people in California will see the importance of trying to right this wrong," said Shepard, the family spokesman.

State Sen. Steven Bradford, a coauthor of the legislation, said the story of Charles and Willa Bruce is not unique in California.

"Black-owned properties experienced tremendous amounts of hatred, harassment, hostility and violence at the hand of the ku klux klan, who cold-bloodedly threatened the Bruces and other families who dared to enjoy their property."























« Last Edit: April 14, 2021, 07:52:24 pm by Battle »

Offline Battle

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Wednesday, 14th April  Twenty One (originally published Monday, 26th June 2017)
African Americans Have Lost Untold Acres of Land Over the Last Century
by Leah Douglas








Driving the long, flat roads of Hilton Head Island is hypnotic.

One bike-rental shop blends into another; countless villa-style office complexes advertise real-estate agents and banks.

Tourists meander to their cars wearing all white, carrying brightly colored smoothies.

Rows of palm trees wave slowly over the crawling traffic.
 
A waterfront hotel looms on the horizon.

Along Allen Road, though, an older version of Hilton Head is preserved.

The short street bisects a 38-acre plot and travels past some 23 trailers that house members of the Allen family.

Tall oak and pine trees block the sun from flowering shrubs in the sandy soil.

The noise from passing cars is drowned out by bird chatter and an occasional shout from one family member to another.

Matthew Allen, now in his 70s, grew up visiting this family land where his father and grandfather grew up.

“When [my father] was coming up,” he recalls,

“they used to…go down to the water to fish. They used to hunt. [They] used to farm the land, used to grow okra, corn, sweet potatoes. They took full advantage of the land.”

It was Dennis Allen, Matthew’s great-grandfather, who purchased the land on Hilton Head.

The son of enslaved, Dennis Allen bought his first parcel of nearly 20 acres in 1897, at a time when African Americans were purchasing land across the country.

Today, the Allen family owns the largest undeveloped lot on Hilton Head.

But as the land enters its 120th year in the family, the Allens are struggling to hold on to it.

Because of ambiguities surrounding the land’s title, there is no primary owner of the property; all of the heirs of the original owners—and there are more than 100 known heirs—are legally co-owners.

As such, the land is classified as “heirs’ property,” a designation that makes it vulnerable to being sold without the family’s full consent.

As the Allens attempt to overcome a stacked legal system—exacerbated by corrupt lawyers and predatory developers—they are at the center of a decades-long fight to retain black-owned land across the South.

In the 45 years following the Civil War, freed slaves and their descendants accumulated roughly 15 million acres of land across the United States, most of it in the South.

Land ownership meant stability and opportunity for black families, a shot at upward mobility and economic security for future generations.

The hard-won property was generally used for farming, the primary occupation of most Southern blacks in the early 20th century.

By 1920, there were 925,000 black-owned farms, representing about 14 percent of all farms in the United States.

Over the course of the 20th century, however, that number dropped precipitously.

Millions of farmers of all races were pushed off their land in the early part of the century, including around 600,000 black farmers.

By 1975, just 45,000 black-owned farms remained.


“It was almost as if the earth was opening up and swallowing black farmers,” writes scholar Pete Daniel in his book Dispossession: Discrimination Against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights.

Implicit in the decline of Black farming was the loss of the land those farmers once tilled.

Today, African Americans compose less than 2 percent of the nation’s farmers and 1 percent of its rural landowners.

Many factors contributed to the loss of Black-owned land during the 20th century, including systemic discrimination in lending by the US Department of Agriculture, the industrialization that lured workers into factories, and the Great Migration.

But the lesser-known issue of heirs’ property also played a role, allowing untold thousands of acres to be forcibly bought out from under Black rural families—often second-, third-, or fourth-generation landowners whose ancestors were enslaved—by real-estate developers and speculators.

By one estimate, 81 percent of these early Black landowners didn’t make wills, largely due to a lack of access to legal resources.

Their descendants then inherited the land without a clear title, and it thereby became designated as heirs’ property.

Although heirs’ property exists in many regions of the country, it’s most prevalent in low-income communities.

In the South, according to one estimate, more than 50 percent of heirs’-property owners are African-American, many of them the descendants of enslaved and sharecroppers.

The Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, based in Charleston County, South Carolina, estimates that there are 105,000 acres of heirs’ property in its 15-county service area alone.

Without a clear title, heirs’-property owners are limited in what they can do with their land.

They can’t get mortgages or do extensive repairs on their homes; as a consequence, some live in trailers.

They aren’t eligible to apply for state or federal housing aid (such as funds provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency) or for nearly any of the programs administered by the Department of Agriculture, including the crucial loans and conservation funding that keep many rural landowners afloat.

“So [they’re] already hampered because [they] have heirs’ property,” explains Jennie L. Stephens, the executive director of the center,

“but now [they’re] sitting here with these hundreds of acres, and [they] can’t do anything with it.”

As with the Allen family, heirs’ property is often jointly owned by many descendants, some of whom are scattered across the country and may never have met one another.

Each has a claim to the land, but this type of joint ownership makes them vulnerable to a peculiar legal challenge:

Any one of these co-owners has the legal right to sell their share of the property—or even to bring the whole parcel of land to court-ordered auction—without the consent of the others.

These “partition sales” are one cause of the dispossession crisis, according to the Heirs’ Property Retention Coalition.

Property developers entice faraway relatives who may never have visited their family’s land to sell their share for a fraction of its market value.

Once they buy a share, these developers can then sell all of the land at auction for a large profit.

A 2001 report from the US Agricultural Census estimated that about 80 percent of Black-owned farmland had disappeared in the South since 1969.

Approximately half of that land was lost through partition sales.

Thomas W. Mitchell, an expert in heirs’ property at the Texas A&M University School of Law, says families will often try to fend off partition sales by arguing that their land is historically significant, or of cultural importance to the African-American community.

But until recently, the courts weren’t legally required to take into account the historical or cultural value of the land, and so they generally don’t.

Mitchell attributes the persistent and ongoing issue of partition sales in the African-American community to a question of power, at least in part.

“If the Kennedys, the Bushes, or the Clintons had their property sold under these circumstances,” he says,

“the law would have been reformed” by now.

Hilton Head, on the southeastern coast of South Carolina, is one of more than 100 coastal islands that form the Sea Islands.

Though it is now primarily known as a golfing and resort destination, Hilton Head was once almost entirely inhabited by the Gullah people.

The Gullah are descendants of enslaved West Africans who, like Dennis Allen, moved to the Sea Island region at the end of the Civil War, or who had previously been enslaved on area plantations.

Gullah communities thrived for decades on the isolated islands, largely free of the restrictions of the Jim Crow South.

For generations, they maintained an agricultural, barter-based economy.

Then, in the mid-1950s, development came to Hilton Head.

Wealthy industrialists bought up hundreds of acres for recreational sites as highway and bridge construction made it easier for mainland residents to reach the islands.

By the 1990s, the waterfront properties on Hilton Head had become highly desirable among wealthy whites seeking a vacation home.

The development displaced many Gullah people.

Some families lost their land to rising property taxes, which they could no longer afford to pay, but others lost their land in partition sales, their property brought to auction by developers in forced sales or by partial owners convinced to sell it for a fraction of its value.

In areas where the Gullah once made up 90 percent or more of the population, they account for as little as 10 percent today, according to Willie Heyward, managing attorney at the Heirs’ Property Law Firm.

Somewhere between 200 and 700 acres of the land on Hilton Head—no one knows the exact number—remain in Gullah hands.

“The property that we owned was prime property,” says Alex Brown, a Gullah native and chair of the island’s planning commission.

“Over time, it’s been sold and traded and stolen.”

And because of the Gullah’s unique history of agricultural production, the loss of land amounts to a loss of culture.

“If we don’t have our land, we don’t have our family,” says Queen Quet, chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation.

“This is the battle we’re in now.”
















« Last Edit: April 15, 2021, 09:14:16 pm by Battle »