Author Topic: Ourstory  (Read 16416 times)

Offline True Father 7

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9/9
« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2011, 07:43:55 am »
1739 - Led by a slave named Jemmy (Cato), a slave revolt occurs
       in Stono, South Carolina. Twenty-five whites are killed
       before the insurrection is put down.

1806 - Sarah Mapps Douglass is born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
       She is the daughter of renowned abolitionists Robert
       Douglass, Sr. and Grace Bustill Douglass. As a child, she
       enjoys life among Philadelphia's elite and will be well
       educated by a private tutor. She will become a teacher in
       New York, but will return to Philadelphia where she will
       operate a successful private school for Black women,
       giving women of color the opportunity to receive a high
       school education. As the daughter of one of the
       Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society's founding
       members, she will become active in the abolitionist
       movement at a young age. She will develop a distaste for
       the prejudices of white Quakers early on and will devote
       much of her life to combating slavery and racism. She
       will develop a close friendship with white Quaker
       abolitionists Sarah and Angelina Grimke. At the urgings
       of the Grimke sisters, She will attend the Anti-Slavery
       Convention of American Women, held in New York in
       1837--the first national convention of American
       antislavery women to integrate Black and white members--
       and serve on the ten-member committee on arrangements for
       the convention. Throughout her abolitionist career, she
       will also serve as recording secretary, librarian, and
       manager for the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society,
       contribute to both the Liberator and the Anglo-African
       Magazine, become a fundraiser for the Black press, give
       numerous public lectures, and serve as vice-president of
       the women's branch of the Freedmen's Aid Society. From
       1853 to 1877, she will serve as a supervisor at the
       Institute for Colored Youth, a Quaker-sponsored
       establishment. During this time, she will also acquire
       basic medical training at the Female Medical College of
       Pennsylvania and at Pennsylvania Medical University,
       where she will study female health and hygiene--subjects
       on which she will lecture in evening classes and at
       meetings of the Banneker Institute. In 1855, she will
       marry African American Episcopal clergyman William
       Douglass. She will join the ancestors in September, 1882.

1816 - Rev. John Gregg Fee, the son of white slaveholders, is
       born in Bracken County, Kentucky. He will become member
       of the American Missionary Association, and will found a
       settlement called "Berea" on land donated to him by an
       admirer, Cassius Marcellus Clay.  It will be later that
       he will be inspired to build a college, adjacent to the
       donated land - Berea College, the first interracial
       college in the state. During the American Civil War, He
       will work at Camp Nelson to have facilities constructed
       to support freedmen and their families, and to provide
       them with education and preaching while the men were being
       taught to be soldiers. He died on January 11, 1901.

1817 - Captain Paul Cuffe, entrepreneur and civil rights
       activist, joins the ancestors at 58, in Westport,
       Masschusetts. Cuffe was a Massachusetts shipbuilder and
       sea captain. He also was one of the most influential
       African American freedmen of the eighteenth century. In
       1780, Cuffe and six other African Americans refused to
       pay taxes util they were granted citizenship.
       Massachusetts gave African Americans who owned property
       the vote three years later.  Although Cuffe became
       wealthy, he believed that most African Americans would
       never be completely accepted in white society. In 1816,
       Cuffe began one of the first experiments in colonizing
       African Americans in Africa when he brought a group to
       Sierra Leone. Cuffe's experiment helped inspire the
       founding of the American Colonization Society later
       that year.

1823 - Alexander Lucius Twilight, becomes the first African
       American to earn a baccalaureate degree in the United
       States, when he graduates from Middlebury College with
       a BA degree.

1915 - A group of visionary scholars (George Cleveland Hall,
       W.B. Hartgrove, Alexander L. Jackson, and James E.
       Stamps) led by Dr. Carter G. Woodson found the
       Association for the Study of Negro Life and History
       (ASNLH) in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Woodson is convinced
       that among scholars, the role of his own people in
       American history and in the history of other cultures
       was being either ignored or misrepresented. Dr. Woodson
       realizes the need for special research into the
       neglected past of the Negro. The association is the
       only organization of its kind concerned with preserving
       African American history.

1934 - Sonia Sanchez is born in Birmingham, Alabama.  She will
       become a noted poet, playwright, short story writer, and
       author of children's books. She will be most noted for
       her poetry volumes "We a BaddDDD People", "A Blues Book
       for Blue Black Magical Women", and anthologies she will
       edit including "We Be Word Sorcerers: 25 Stories by
       Black Americans."

1941 - Otis Redding is born in Dawson, Georgia, the son of a
       Baptist minister. He will become a rhythm and blues
       musician and singer and will be best known for his
       recording of "[Sittin' on] The Dock of the Bay," which
       will be released after he joins the ancestors (succumbs in
       a small airplane crash) in December, 1967. Some of his
       other hits were "I've Been Loving You Too Long", "Respect",
       and "Try A Little Tenderness."

1942 - Inez Foxx is born in Greensboro, North Carolina. She will
       become a rhythm and blues singer and will perform as
       part of a duuo act with her brother, Charlie. Their
       biggest hit will be "Mockingbird" in 1963. They will
       record together until 1967.

1942 - Luther Simmons is born in New York City, New York. He
       will become a rhythm and blues singer with the group
       "The Main Ingredient."  They will be best known for
       their hit, "Everybody Plays the Fool."

1945 - Dione LaRue is born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  She
       will become a rhythm and blues singer better known as
       "Dee Dee Sharp." Her first hit will be "It's Mashed
       Potato Time" in 1962. She will also record "Gravy" [For
       My Mashed Potatoes], "Ride!", "Do the Bird", and "Slow
       Twistin' "(with Chubby Checker).

1946 – Singer and muscian, Billy Preston was born

1957 - President Eisenhower signs the first civil rights bill
       passed by Congress since Reconstruction.

1957 - Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth is mobbed when he attempts to
       enroll his daughters in a "white" Birmingham school.

1957 - Nashville's new Hattie Cotton Elementary School with
       enrollment of one African American and 388 whites is
       virtually destroyed by a dynamite blast.

1962 - Two churches are burned near Sasser, Georgia. African
       American leaders ask the president to stop the "Nazi-
       like reign of terror in southwest Georgia."

1963 - Alabama Governor George Wallace is served a federal
       injunction when he orders state police to bar African
       American students from enrolling in white schools.

1965 – Hip Hop pioneer M.C. Shan was born Shawn Moltke in Queens , New York , on this day in 1965.
1971 - More than 1,200 inmates at the Attica Correctional
       Facility in upstate New York gain control of the
       facility in a well-planned takeover. During the initial
       violence, 50 correctional officers and civilian
       employees are beaten and taken hostage. Correctional
       officer William Quinn receives the roughest beating and
       is soon freed by the inmates due to the severity of his
       injuries. Police handling of the takeover will result
       in the deaths of many inmates and will turn the nation's
       interest toward the conditions in U.S. penal
       institutions.

1981 - Vernon E. Jordan resigns as president of the National
       Urban League and announces plans to join a Washington DC
       legal firm.  He will be succeeded by John E. Jacob,
       executive vice president of the league.

1985 - President Reagan orders sanctions against South Africa
       because of that country's apartheid policies.

1990 - Liberian President Samuel K. Doe is captured and joins
       the ancestors after being killed by rebel forces. In
       1985, he was elected president, but Charles Taylor and
       followers overthrew his government in 1989, which will
       spark a seven-year long civil war.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2011, 07:45:34 am by True Father 7 »
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

Offline True Father 7

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Re: 9/9
« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2011, 08:20:09 am »
1739 - Led by a slave named Jemmy (Cato), a slave revolt occurs
       in Stono, South Carolina. Twenty-five whites are killed
       before the insurrection is put down.

1806 - Sarah Mapps Douglass is born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
       She is the daughter of renowned abolitionists Robert
       Douglass, Sr. and Grace Bustill Douglass. As a child, she
       enjoys life among Philadelphia's elite and will be well
       educated by a private tutor. She will become a teacher in
       New York, but will return to Philadelphia where she will
       operate a successful private school for Black women,
       giving women of color the opportunity to receive a high
       school education. As the daughter of one of the
       Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society's founding
       members, she will become active in the abolitionist
       movement at a young age. She will develop a distaste for
       the prejudices of white Quakers early on and will devote
       much of her life to combating slavery and racism. She
       will develop a close friendship with white Quaker
       abolitionists Sarah and Angelina Grimke. At the urgings
       of the Grimke sisters, She will attend the Anti-Slavery
       Convention of American Women, held in New York in
       1837--the first national convention of American
       antislavery women to integrate Black and white members--
       and serve on the ten-member committee on arrangements for
       the convention. Throughout her abolitionist career, she
       will also serve as recording secretary, librarian, and
       manager for the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society,
       contribute to both the Liberator and the Anglo-African
       Magazine, become a fundraiser for the Black press, give
       numerous public lectures, and serve as vice-president of
       the women's branch of the Freedmen's Aid Society. From
       1853 to 1877, she will serve as a supervisor at the
       Institute for Colored Youth, a Quaker-sponsored
       establishment. During this time, she will also acquire
       basic medical training at the Female Medical College of
       Pennsylvania and at Pennsylvania Medical University,
       where she will study female health and hygiene--subjects
       on which she will lecture in evening classes and at
       meetings of the Banneker Institute. In 1855, she will
       marry African American Episcopal clergyman William
       Douglass. She will join the ancestors in September, 1882.

1816 - Rev. John Gregg Fee, the son of white slaveholders, is
       born in Bracken County, Kentucky. He will become member
       of the American Missionary Association, and will found a
       settlement called "Berea" on land donated to him by an
       admirer, Cassius Marcellus Clay.  It will be later that
       he will be inspired to build a college, adjacent to the
       donated land - Berea College, the first interracial
       college in the state. During the American Civil War, He
       will work at Camp Nelson to have facilities constructed
       to support freedmen and their families, and to provide
       them with education and preaching while the men were being
       taught to be soldiers. He died on January 11, 1901.

1817 - Captain Paul Cuffe, entrepreneur and civil rights
       activist, joins the ancestors at 58, in Westport,
       Masschusetts. Cuffe was a Massachusetts shipbuilder and
       sea captain. He also was one of the most influential
       African American freedmen of the eighteenth century. In
       1780, Cuffe and six other African Americans refused to
       pay taxes util they were granted citizenship.
       Massachusetts gave African Americans who owned property
       the vote three years later.  Although Cuffe became
       wealthy, he believed that most African Americans would
       never be completely accepted in white society. In 1816,
       Cuffe began one of the first experiments in colonizing
       African Americans in Africa when he brought a group to
       Sierra Leone. Cuffe's experiment helped inspire the
       founding of the American Colonization Society later
       that year.

1823 - Alexander Lucius Twilight, becomes the first African
       American to earn a baccalaureate degree in the United
       States, when he graduates from Middlebury College with
       a BA degree.

1915 - A group of visionary scholars (George Cleveland Hall,
       W.B. Hartgrove, Alexander L. Jackson, and James E.
       Stamps) led by Dr. Carter G. Woodson found the
       Association for the Study of Negro Life and History
       (ASNLH) in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Woodson is convinced
       that among scholars, the role of his own people in
       American history and in the history of other cultures
       was being either ignored or misrepresented. Dr. Woodson
       realizes the need for special research into the
       neglected past of the Negro. The association is the
       only organization of its kind concerned with preserving
       African American history.

1934 - Sonia Sanchez is born in Birmingham, Alabama.  She will
       become a noted poet, playwright, short story writer, and
       author of children's books. She will be most noted for
       her poetry volumes "We a BaddDDD People", "A Blues Book
       for Blue Black Magical Women", and anthologies she will
       edit including "We Be Word Sorcerers: 25 Stories by
       Black Americans."

1941 - Otis Redding is born in Dawson, Georgia, the son of a
       Baptist minister. He will become a rhythm and blues
       musician and singer and will be best known for his
       recording of "[Sittin' on] The Dock of the Bay," which
       will be released after he joins the ancestors (succumbs in
       a small airplane crash) in December, 1967. Some of his
       other hits were "I've Been Loving You Too Long", "Respect",
       and "Try A Little Tenderness."

1942 - Inez Foxx is born in Greensboro, North Carolina. She will
       become a rhythm and blues singer and will perform as
       part of a duuo act with her brother, Charlie. Their
       biggest hit will be "Mockingbird" in 1963. They will
       record together until 1967.

1942 - Luther Simmons is born in New York City, New York. He
       will become a rhythm and blues singer with the group
       "The Main Ingredient."  They will be best known for
       their hit, "Everybody Plays the Fool."

1945 - Dione LaRue is born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  She
       will become a rhythm and blues singer better known as
       "Dee Dee Sharp." Her first hit will be "It's Mashed
       Potato Time" in 1962. She will also record "Gravy" [For
       My Mashed Potatoes], "Ride!", "Do the Bird", and "Slow
       Twistin' "(with Chubby Checker).

1946 – Singer and muscian, Billy Preston was born

1957 - President Eisenhower signs the first civil rights bill
       passed by Congress since Reconstruction.

1957 - Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth is mobbed when he attempts to
       enroll his daughters in a "white" Birmingham school.

1957 - Nashville's new Hattie Cotton Elementary School with
       enrollment of one African American and 388 whites is
       virtually destroyed by a dynamite blast.

1962 - Two churches are burned near Sasser, Georgia. African
       American leaders ask the president to stop the "Nazi-
       like reign of terror in southwest Georgia."

1963 - Alabama Governor George Wallace is served a federal
       injunction when he orders state police to bar African
       American students from enrolling in white schools.

1965 – Hip Hop pioneer M.C. Shan was born Shawn Moltke in Queens , New York , on this day in 1965.
1971 - More than 1,200 inmates at the Attica Correctional
       Facility in upstate New York gain control of the
       facility in a well-planned takeover. During the initial
       violence, 50 correctional officers and civilian
       employees are beaten and taken hostage. Correctional
       officer William Quinn receives the roughest beating and
       is soon freed by the inmates due to the severity of his
       injuries. Police handling of the takeover will result
       in the deaths of many inmates and will turn the nation's
       interest toward the conditions in U.S. penal
       institutions.

1981 - Vernon E. Jordan resigns as president of the National
       Urban League and announces plans to join a Washington DC
       legal firm.  He will be succeeded by John E. Jacob,
       executive vice president of the league.

1985 - President Reagan orders sanctions against South Africa
       because of that country's apartheid policies.

1990 - Liberian President Samuel K. Doe is captured and joins
       the ancestors after being killed by rebel forces. In
       1985, he was elected president, but Charles Taylor and
       followers overthrew his government in 1989, which will
       spark a seven-year long civil war.


this was for yesterday by the way which is recognized as Eid-al-Fatir which is the end of Ramadan, also in 1999, a Texas jury imposes the death sentence on Lawrence Russell Brewer, the second white supremacist convicted of killing James Byrd Jr.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

Offline True Father 7

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9/10
« Reply #17 on: September 10, 2011, 09:25:08 am »
1847 - John Roy Lynch is born a slave in Concordia Parish,
       Louisiana. Becoming free during the American Civil War,
       he will settle in Natchez, Mississippi. There he will
       learn the photography business, attend night school, and
       enter public life in 1869 as justice of the peace for
       Natchez county. In November, 1869 Lynch will be elected
       to the Mississippi House of Representatives, and re-
       elected in 1871.  Although Blacks never will be in the
       majority in the Mississippi legislature, Lynch will be
       chosen speaker of the House in 1872. He will be elected
       to the U.s. House of Representatives in 1873. In 1884,
       he will become the first African American to preside
       over a national convention of a major U.S. political
       party and deliver the keynote address, when he was
       appointed temporary chairman. In his book, "The Facts
       of Reconstruction" (1913), Lynch will attempt to dispel
       the erroneous notion that Southern state governments
       after the Civil War were under the control of Blacks.
       He will join the ancestors on November 2, 1939 in
       Chicago, Illinois.

1886 - Poet Georgia Douglas Johnson is born in Atlanta, Georgia.
       (Editor's Note: Her birth is uncertain, given as early as
       1877 and as late as 1886). Among her books will be "Heart
       of a Woman", "Bronze", "An Autumn Love  Cycle", and "Share
       My Love".  She will be anthologized in Arna Bontemps's
       "American Negro Poetry" and Davis and Lee's "Negro
       Caravan," among others. Her home in Washington, DC, will
       become the center for African American literary
       gatherings. She will join the ancestors on May 14, 1966.

1913 - George W. Buckner, a physician from Indiana, is named
       minister to Liberia.

1913 - The Cleveland Call & Post newspaper is established.

1927 - Jacques E. Leeds in born in Baltimore, Maryland. He will
       become a leading African American attorney in Baltimore.
       He will become the first African American appointed a
       commisioner on the Maryland Worker's Compensation
       Commission in 1991 (by governor William Donald Schaefer).

1930 - Charles E. Mitchell, certified public accountant and banker
       from West Virginia, is named minister to Liberia.

1940 - Roy Ayers is born in Los Angeles, California.  In high
       school Ayers will form his first group, the Latin Lyrics,
       and in the early 60s will begin working professionally
       with flautist/saxophonist Curtis Amy. He will become a
       popular jazz vibraphonist and vocalist, reaching the peak
       of his commercial popularity during the mid-70s and early
       80s.

1956 - Louisville, Kentucky integrates its public school system.

1960 - Running barefoot, Ethiopian Abebe Bikila wins the marathon
       at the Rome Olympic Games.

1961 - Jomo Kenyatta returns to Kenya from exile to lead his
       country.

1962 - Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black vacates an order of a
       lower court, ruling that the University of Mississippi
       had to admit James H. Meredith, an African American Air
       Force veteran whose application for admission had been on
       file and in the courts for fourteen months.

1963 - 20 African American students enter public schools in
       Birmingham, Tuskegee and Mobile, Alabama, following a
       standoff between federal authorities and Governor George
       C. Wallace.

1965 - Father Divine joins the ancestors in Philadelphia,
       Pennsylvania. Divine, born George Baker, was the founder
       of the Peace Mission, a religious group whose followers
       worshiped Divine as God incarnate on earth.

1968 - Big Daddy Kane was born Antonio Monterio Hardy in Brooklyn , New York on this day in 1968. He was one of the most lyrical, trendsetting mcs and regarded as one of the most influential and skilled “golden age” rappers, and –by some account-one of the greatest of all time.

1973 - A commemorative stamp of Henry Ossawa Tanner is issued by
       the U.S. Postal Service. Part of its American Arts issue,
       the stamp celebrates the work and accomplishments of
       Tanner, the first African American artist elected to the
       National Academy of Design.

1974 - Guinea-Bissau gains independence from Portugal.

1976 - Mordecai Johnson, the first African American president of
       Howard University, joins the ancestors at age 86.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

Offline True Father 7

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9/11
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2011, 03:31:48 am »
1740 - An issue of the Pennsylvania Gazette reports on a Negro
       named Simon who reportedly can "bleed and draw teeth."
       It is the first mention of an African American doctor or
       dentist in the American Colonies.

1885 - Moses A. Hopkins, minister and educator, is named minister
       to Liberia.

1923 - Charles Evers is born in Decatur, Mississippi. He will
       become a civil rights worker who will assume the post of
       field director of the Mississippi NAACP after his
       brother, Medgar, is assassinated in 1963. He will be
       elected mayor of Fayette, Mississippi, in 1969.

1943 - Loletha Elaine "Lola" Falana is born in Camden, New
       Jersey. She will become a dancer, most notably in
       Broadway's "Golden Boy", and be a successful performer
       on television and in Las Vegas, where she will be called
       "The First Lady of Las Vegas." In the late 1980s, she
       will suffer from a relapse of multiple sclerosis. Her
       relapse will be severe, leaving her left side paralyzed
       and becoming partially blind with her voice and hearing
       impaired. Recovery will last a year and a half, during
       which she will spend most of her time praying. She will
       attribute her recovery to a spiritual experience
       described as "Being able to feel the presence of the
       Lord." She will convert to Roman Catholicism and work
       her newly-found spirituality into her everyday life.
       Though she will perform again in Las Vegas shows in 1987,
       her practice of religion and faith will become the center
       of her life. After another bout with multiple sclerosis
       in 1996, she will return to Philadelphia and live with
       her parents for a short time. No longer performing, she
       will tour the country with a message of hope and
       spirituality. When not on tour, she will live a quiet
       life in Las Vegas, working on the apostolate she will
       found, "The Lambs of God Ministry." The ministry will be
       focused on helping children who have been orphaned in
       Sub-Saharan Africa, and will work closely with the group,
       "Save Sub-Saharan Orphans."

1959 - Duke Ellington receives the NAACP's Spingarn Medal for
       his outstanding musical achievements and contributions
       to the field of music.

1962 - Two youths involved in a voter registration drive in
       Mississippi are wounded by shotgun blasts fired through
       the window of a home in Ruleville. A spokesperson for
       SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) asks
       the president to "convene a special White House
       Conference to discuss means of stopping the wave of
       terror sweeping through the South, especially where
       SNCC is working on voter registration."

1967 – The City Inc. an alternative school and community service center was founded in Minneapolis, MN

1974 – Haile Selassi I is deposed from the Ethiopian throne.

1977 - Quincy Jones wins an Emmy for outstanding achievement in
       musical composition for the miniseries "Roots".  It is
       one of nine Emmys for the series, an unprecedented
       number.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

Offline True Father 7

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9/12
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2011, 06:34:36 am »
Cape Verde Independence Day

1913 - James Cleveland Owens is born in Oakville, Alabama. He
       will be better known as Jesse Owens, one of the greatest
       track and field stars in history.  Owens will achieve
       fame at the 1936 Summer Olympic Games in Berlin, where
       he will win four gold medals, dispelling Hitler's notion
       of the superior Aryan race and the inferiority of Black
       athletes. Among his honors will be the Medal of Freedom,
       presented to him by President Gerald Ford in 1976. He will
       join the ancestors on March 31, 1980.

1935 - Richard Hunt is born in Chicago, Illinois.  A graduate of
       the Art Institute of Chicago, he will later study in
       Europe and be considered one of the leading sculptors in
       the United States.  His work will be shown extensively
       in the United States and abroad and his sculptures will
       be collected by the National Museum of American Art, the
       Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum
       of Art, and the Museum of the Twentieth Century in
       Vienna. On April 29, 2009, he will be awarded the Lifetime
       Achievement Award by the International Sculpture Center.
       His web site is http://www.RichardHunt.us.

1944 - Barry White is born in Galveston, Texas. He will become a
       singer and songwriter. Some of his hits will be "I'm
       Gonna Love You Just A Little More Baby", "Can't Get
       Enough Of Your Love Babe", and "Love's Theme [with Love
       Unlimited Orchestra]. He will join the ancestors on July
       4, 2003 from complications of high blood pressure and
       kidney disease.

1956 - African American students are barred from entering a Clay,
       Kentucky elementary school. They will enter the school
       under National Guard protection on September 17.

1958 - The United States Supreme Court orders a Little Rock,
       Arkansas high school to admit African American students.

1974 - The beginning of court-ordered busing to achieve racial
       integration in Boston's public schools is marred by
       violence in South Boston.

1974 - Haile Selassie is deposed by military leaders after fifty-
       eight years as the ruling monarch of Ethiopia.

1977 - Black South African student and civil rights leader Steven
       Biko joins the ancestors after succumbing to severe
       physical abuse while in police detention, triggering an
       international outcry.

1980 - Lillian Randolph joins the ancestors at the age of 65. She
       had been a film actress and had starred on television on
       the "Amos 'n' Andy Show" and in the mini-series "Roots".

1986 - The National Council of Negro Women sponsors its first
       Black Family Reunion at the National Mall in Washington,
       DC. The reunion, which will grow to encompass dozens of
       cities and attract over one million people annually, is
       held to celebrate and applaud the traditional values,
       history, and culture of the African American family.

1989 - David Dinkins, Manhattan borough president, wins the New
       York City's Democratic mayoral primary, defeating
       incumbent Mayor Ed Koch and two other candidates on his
       way to becoming the city's first African American mayor.

1992 - Mae C. Jemison becomes the first woman of color to go into
       space when she travels on the space shuttle Endeavour.

2000 - James Perkins becomes the first African American mayor of
       Selma, Alabama, defeating long-time mayor Joe Smitherman
       with 60% of the vote.  Smitherman had been mayor for
       thirty six years. He was the mayor of Selma in 1965 when
       sheriff's deputies and state troopers attacked hundreds
       of voting rights marchers on Selma's Edmund Pettus
       Bridge in what became known as "Bloody Sunday."
« Last Edit: September 12, 2011, 07:02:07 am by True Father 7 »
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/13
« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2011, 07:52:34 pm »
1663 - The first known slave revolt in the thirteen American
       colonies is planned in Gloucester County, Virginia.
       The conspirators, both white servants and African
       American slaves, are betrayed by fellow indentured
       servants.
1885 – Alaine Locke, noted for his writings and defining the “Harlem Renaissance” was born in Philadelphia, PA

1867 - Gen. E.R.S. Canby orders South Carolina courts to
       impanel African American jurors.

1881 - Louis Latimer patents an electric lamp with a carbon
       filament.

1886 - Alain Leroy Locke is born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
       He will graduate from Harvard University in 1907 with a
       degree in philosophy and become the first African
       American Rhodes scholar, studying at Oxford University
       from 1907-10 and the University of Berlin from 1910-11.
       He will receive his Ph.D. in philosophy from Harvard in
       1918. For almost 40 years, until retirement in 1953 as
       head of the department of philosophy, Locke will teach
       at Howard University, Washington, DC. He will be best
       known for his involvement with the Harlem Renaissance,
       although his work and influence extend well beyond.
       Through "The New Negro", published in 1925, Locke
       popularized and most adequately defined the Renaissance
       as a movement in Black arts and letters. He will join
       the ancestors on June 9, 1954.



1962 - Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett defies the federal
       government in an impassioned speech on statewide radio-
       television hookup, saying he would "interpose" the
       authority of the state between the University of
       Mississippi and federal judges who had ordered the
       admission of James H. Meredith. Barnett says, "There is
       no case in history where the Caucasian race has survived
       social integration." He promises to go to jail, if
       necessary, to prevent integration at the state
       university. His defiance set the stage for the gravest
       federal/state crisis since the Civil War.

1962 - President John F. Kennedy denounces the burning of
       churches in Georgia and supports voter registration
       drives in the South.

1971 - Two hundred troopers and officers storm the Attica
       Correctional Facility in upstate New York under orders
       from Governor Nelson Rockefeller.   Thirty-three
       convicts and ten guards are killed. Later investigations
       show that nine of the ten guards were killed by the
       storming party. This riot will focus national attention
       on corrections departments nationwide and the practice
       of imprisonment in the United States. A National
       Conference on Corrections will be convened in December,
       1971 resulting in the formation of the National
       Institute of Corrections in 1974.

1972 - Two African Americans, Johnny Ford of Tuskegee and A.J.
       Cooper of Prichard, are elected mayors in Alabama.

1979 - South Africa grants Venda independence (Not recognized
       outside of South Africa). Venda is a homeland situated
       in the north eastern part of the Transvaal Province of
       South Africa.

1989 - Archbishop Desmond Tutu leads huge crowds of singing and
       dancing people through central Cape Town in the biggest
       anti-apartheid protest march in South Africa for 30
       years.

1996 – Hip hop legend Tupac Amaru Shakur joins the ancestors six days after
       being the target of a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas at
       the age of 25.  While his murder initially blamed on a media incited eastcoast westcoast rivalry, new research suggest he was targeted for his activism and vocal defiance of the status quo
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/14
« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2011, 06:55:25 pm »
1874 - White Democrats seize the statehouse in a Louisiana coup
       d'etat. President Grant orders the revolutionaries to
       disperse, and the rebellion collapses. Twenty-seven
       persons (sixteen whites and eleven Blacks) are killed in
       battles between the Democrats and Republicans.

1891 - John Adams Hyman joins the ancestors in Washington, DC.
       He was the first African American congressman from the
       state of North Carolina.

1921 - Constance Baker Motley is born in New Haven, Connecticut.
       She will achieve many distinctions in her career,
       including being the first African American woman elected
       to the New York Senate in 1964, the first woman Manhattan
       borough president, and the first African American woman to be
       named as a federal court judge in 1966. She will later
       serve as chief judge of the Southern District of New
       York until she joins the ancestors on September 28, 2005.

1940 - African Americans are allowed to enter all branches of
       the United States Military Service, when President
       Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the Selective Service Act.

1964 - Leontyne Price and A. Philip Randolph are among the
       recipients of the Medal of Freedom awarded by President
       Lyndon B. Johnson.

1970 - One African American is killed and two whites are injured
       in shoot-out between activists and police officers in a
       New Orleans housing project.

1973 – Hip hop legend Nas was born. Although it received less attention than his feaud with Jay-Z, Nas- like Prince – enraged in a public feud with his record label, describing music industry practices as a modern-day slavery

1980 – Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, physician and second president of the National Council for Negro Women, dies in Washington, DC.

2003 - Yetunde Price, the oldest sister of tennis stars Venus
       and Serena Williams, joins the ancestors at the age of
       31 after being killed in a shooting at her place of
       business.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/15
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2011, 01:40:36 pm »
1830 - The first National Negro Convention begins in Philadelphia,
       Pennsylvania.
 
1852 – Jan Matzeliger, inventor of the shoe lasting machine was born in Dutch Guiana
 
1876 - White terrorists attack Republicans in Ellenton, South
       Carolina. Two whites and thirty-nine African Americans are
       killed.
 
1890 - Claude McKay is born in Sunnyville, Jamaica. Immigrating to
       the United States in 1912, he will become a poet and
       winner of the 1928 Harmon Gold Medal Award for Literature.
       Author of the influential poetry collection "Harlem
       Shadows", he will also be famous for the poems "The
       Lynching," "White Houses," and "If We Must Die," which
       will be used by Winston Churchill as a rallying cry during
       World War II. He will join the ancestors on May 22, 1948.
 
1898 - The National Afro-American Council is founded in Rochester,
       New York. Bishop Alexander Walters of the AME Zion Church
       is elected president. The organization proposes a program
       of assertion and protest.
 
1923 - The governor of Oklahoma declares that Oklahoma is in a
       "state of virtual rebellion and insurrection" because of
       Ku Klux Klan activities.  Martial law is declared.
 
1924 - Robert Waltrip "Bobby" Short is born in Danville, Illinois. He
       will become a singer and pianist. In 1968, he will be offered
       a two-week stint at the Café Carlyle in New York City, to
       fill in for George Feyer. He (accompanied by Beverly Peer on
       bass and Dick Sheridan on drums) will become an institution at
       the Carlyle, as Feyer had been before him, and will remain
       there as a featured performer for over 35 years.  In 2000, The
       Library of Congress will designate him a Living Legend, a
       recognition established as part of its bicentennial
       celebration. He will join the ancestors on March 21, 2005.
 
1928 - Julian Edwin Adderly is born in Tampa, Florida.  He will be
       best known as "Cannonball" Adderly, a jazz saxophonist who
       will play with Miles Davis as well as lead his own band
       with brother Nat Adderly and musicians such as Yusef
       Lateef and George Duke. Songs made famous by him and his bands
       include "This Here" (written by Bobby Timmons), "The Jive
       Samba," "Work Song" (written by Nat Adderley), "Mercy, Mercy,
       Mercy" (written by Joe Zawinul) and "Walk Tall" (written by
       Zawinul, Marrow and Rein). He will join the ancestors on August
       8, 1975. Later that year, he will be inducted into the Down Beat
       Jazz Hall of Fame.
 
1943 - Actor and activist Paul Robeson acts in the 296th
       performance of "Othello" at the Shubert Theatre in New
       York City.
 
1963 - Four African American schoolgirls - Addie Collins, Denise
       McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley - join the ancestors
       after being killed in a bombing at the Sixteenth Street Baptist
       Church in Birmingham, Alabama. It is an act of violence that
       will galvanize the civil rights movement.
 
1964 - Rev. K.L. Buford and Dr. Stanley Smith are elected to the
       Tuskegee City Council and become the first African
       American elected officials in Alabama in the twentieth
       century.
 
1969 - Large-scale racially motivated disturbances are reported
       in Hartford, Connecticut. Five hundred persons are
       arrested and scores are injured.
 
1978 - Muhammad Ali wins the world heavyweight boxing championship
       for a record third time by defeating Leon Spinks in New
       Orleans, Louisiana.

1992 - Sept.15th – Public Enemy release their 5th album “Greatest Misses” on Def Jam Records. Def Jam Records had wanted to do a greatest hits compilation , which I thought that after only 5 years in the recording industry was premature. So instead “Greatest Misses” became a collection of new songs, unreleased material and remixes of previous hits and album tracks courtesy of Chuck Chill-Out , Sir Jinx , Damon “Dollars” Kelly , Jeff Trotter , Greg Beasley , Shy Skillz and the late great Jam-Master Jay.  “Greatsest Misses” also featured a live U.K. television performance of Pete Rock’s remix to “Shut Em Down” as well as new tracks like the hit single ; “Hazy Shade Of Criminal” as well as “Gotta Do What I Gotta Do” , “Gett Off My Back” , also featured in the 1992 Columbia Pictures film “Mo’ Money” and “Air Hoodlum”.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2011, 03:06:03 pm by True Father 7 »
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/16
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2011, 03:06:33 pm »
Papua New Guinea Independence Day
Citizenship Day (Today commemorates all those who became citizens of the U.S. Historically most African civilizations accepted newcomers with open arms. This, however, also led to their downfall)

1795 - The British capture Capetown in South Africa.

1848 - France abolishes slavery in all of its colonies and territories.

1859 - Lake Nyasa, which forms Malawi's boundary with Tanzania and Mozambique, is first seen by a European, British explorer David Livingstone.

1889 - Claude A. Barnett is born in Sanford, Florida. In 1919, he will found the Associated Negro Press (ANP). By 1935 the ANP will serve over 200 subscribers across the country and after WW II its membership will grow to include more than 100 African American newspapers. During World War II, he and other Black journalists will pressure the U. S. government to accredit Black journalists as war correspondents. In his travels, he will write many accounts on the adverse effects of segregation in the armed forces. He will also focus on the terrible living conditions of Black tenant farmers. From 1942 to 1953, he will serve as a consultant to the Secretary of Agriculture in an effort to improve their conditions. He will be a member of the Tuskegee board of directors until 1965. He will hold a similar post with the American Red Cross, Chicago’s Supreme Liberty Life Insurance Company, and will be president of the board of directors of Provident Hospital. The ANP will cease operating after he joins the ancestors, succumbing to a cerebral hemorrhage in 1967.

1893 - The last Oklahoma land rush, targeted in the territory's Cherokee strip (outlet) begins. More than 10
0,000 homesteaders rush to claim a share of the 6 million acres in this strip of land between Oklahoma and Kansas, opened up by the U.S. government. Among the participants is E.P.McCabe, who will establish the all African American town of Liberty a few days later. McCabe will also be involved in the earlier establishment of the African American town of Langston, Oklahoma, named for John Mercer Langston, Virginia's first African American congressman.  The Oklahoma land rushes started in 1889, but African Americans were excluded from the first one.

1915 - The United States takes control of customs & finances in Haiti for the next 10 years.

1921 - Jon Carl Hendricks is born in Newark, Ohio.  He will become an influential singer in the jazz group,
Lambert, Hendricks and Ross. Pursuing a solo career, he will move his young family to London, England, in

1968, partly so that his five children could receive a better education. While based in London he will tour E
urope and Africa, performing frequently on British television and appear in the British film "Jazz Is Our Religion" as well as the French film "Hommage a Cole Porter." His sold-out club dates will draw fans such as the Rolling Stones and the Beatles. Five years later the Hendricks family will settle in Mill Valley, California where He will work as the jazz critic for the San Francisco Chronicle and teach classes at California State University at Sonoma and the University of California at Berkeley. A piece he will writefor the stage about the history of jazz, "Evolution of the Blues," will run for five years at the Off-Broadway Theatre in San Francisco and another year in Los Angeles. His television documentary, "Somewhere to Lay My Weary Head," will receive Emmy, Iris and Peabody awards. He will record several critically acclaimed albums on his own, some with his wife Judith and daughters Michele and Aria contributing. He will collaborate with old friends, The Manhattan Transfer, for their seminal 1985 album, "Vocalese," which will win seven Grammy Awards. He will serve on the Kennedy Center Honors committee under Presidents Carter, Reagan, and Clinton. In 2000, He will return to his hometown to teach at the University of Toledo, where he will be appointed Distinguished Professor of Jazz Studies and receive an honorary Doctorate of the Performing Arts. He will teach Brandon Wilkins and Paul Okafor. He will be selected to be the first American jazz artist to lecture at the Sorbonne in Paris. His 15-voice group, the Jon Hendricks
Vocalstra at the University of Toledo, will perform at the Sorbonne in 2002. He will also write lyrics to some classical pieces including "On the Trail" from Ferde Grofe's Grand Canyon Suite. The Vocalstra premiered a vocalese version of Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade" with the Toledo Symphony. In the
summer of 2003, He will go on tour with the "Four Brothers", aquartet consisting of Hendricks, Kurt Elling, Mark Murphy and Kevin Mahogany. He will work on setting words to, and arranging Rachmaninoff's second piano concerto as well as on two books, teaching and touring with his Vocalstra. He will also appear in a film with Al Pacino, "People I Know" as well as "White Men Can't Jump."

1925 - Riley B. King is born in Itta Bena, Mississippi.  He will
       become a blues great, known as B(lues) B(oy) King. Playing
       his guitar, nicknamed 'Lucille,' In the 1950s, he will become
       one of the most important names in R&B music, amassing an
       impressive list of hits including "3 O'Clock Blues", "You Know
       I Love You," "Woke Up This Morning," "Please Love Me," "When My
       Heart Beats like a Hammer," "Whole Lotta Love," "You Upset Me
       Baby," "Every Day I Have the Blues", "Sneakin' Around," "Ten
       Long Years," "Bad Luck," "Sweet Little Angel", "On My Word of
       Honor," and "Please Accept My Love." In 1962, he will sign with
       ABC-Paramount Records, which will later be absorbed into MCA
       Records, and then his current label, Geffen Records. In November,
       1964, he will record the "Live at the Regal" album at the Regal
       Theater in Chicago, Illinois. He will win a Grammy Award for a
       tune called "The Thrill Is Gone". His version will become a hit
       on both the pop and R&B charts, which is rare during that time
       for an R&B artist. It will also gain the number 183 spot in
       Rolling Stone magazine's "500 Greatest Songs of All Time." He will
       gain further visibility among rock audiences, as an opening act on
       The Rolling Stones' 1969 American Tour. His mainstream success
       will continue throughout the 1970s with songs like "To Know You is
       to Love You" and "I Like to Live the Love". He will be inducted
       into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1980. In 2004, he will be awarded
       the international Polar Music Prize, given to artists "in
       recognition of exceptional achievements in the creation and
       advancement of music." He will have over 50 hit blues albums and
       win a 1970 Grammy for "The Thrill Is Gone". To date, in over 62
       years, he will play in excess of 15,000 performances.[

1953 - Earl Klugh, Jazz pianist/guitarist, is born in Detroit,
       Michigan. He will become an American smooth jazz/jazz
       fusion guitarist and composer. He normally finger picks a
       nylon string classical guitar. At the age of 13, he will
       be captivated by the guitar playing of Chet Atkins when he
       makes an appearance on the Perry Como Show. He will since
       be a guest on several Atkins albums. Atkins, reciprocating
       as well, joins Earl on his "Magic In Your Eyes" album. He
       will also be influenced by Bob James, Ray Parker Jr, Wes
       Montgomery and Laurindo Almeida. His sound will be a blend
       of these jazz, pop and rhythm and blues influences,
       forming a potpourri of sweet contemporary music original
       to only him. He will become a guitar instructor at the
       young age of 15, and will eventually be discovered by
       Yuseff Lateef. His career will rapidly progress to working
       with the likes of George Benson, George Shearing, Chick
       Corea, and many others. Like several other Detroit-bred
       entertainers, He attended Mumford High School in Detroit.
       For their album "One on One," He and Bob James will
       receive a Grammy award for Best Pop Instrumental
       Performance of 1981. He will receive at least 13 Grammy
       nods and millions of record and CD sales

1961 – T  La Rock was born Clarence Ronnie Keaton in Manhattan , New York , on this day in 1961.Rock , the older brother of m.c Special K. of the legendary Treacherous Three began deejaying and rapping in the early 70’s during the earliest days of hip-hop. Rock’s place in hip-hop was guaranteed , when in 1984 his hit single “It’s Yours” became the 1st release for Def Jam Recordings in a joint release venture with Partytime/Streetwise Records. Rock’s articulate and complex lyrical style would have an influence on future legendary m.c.’s like LL Cool J and Nas. Rock released his debut album “Lyrical King”(From The Boogie Down Bronx) in 1987 on Fresh Records. Rock’s next album would be his last to date when he released “On A Warpath” in 1989. Rock would suffer a traumatic brain injury while attempting to break up a fight in front of his brother’s apartment building in The Bronx in 1994. After having spent several years recovering , Rock began performing again in 2008 and is currently working on a new album.

1965 - San Francisco's Grace Cathedral becomes the site of the first concert of sacred music presented by Duke Ellington.

1971 - Six Klansmen are arrested in connection with the bombing of 10 school buses in Pontiac, Michigan.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/17
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2011, 04:10:10 pm »
National Heroes Day in Angola

1787 - The U.S. Constitution is approved at the Constitutional
       Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with three
       clauses protecting slavery.

1861 - The first day-school for ex-slaves is opened in Fortress
       Monroe, Virginia under the tutelage of an African
       American schoolteacher, Mary S. Peake.  The school will
       later become Hampton Institute (now University) in 1868.

1879 - Andrew "Rube" Foster is born in Calvert, Texas. He will
       become an American baseball player, manager, and
       executive in the Negro Leagues. He will be considered by
       historians to have been perhaps the best African American
       pitcher of the 1900s. He will also found and manage the
       Chicago American Giants, one of the most successful Black
       baseball teams of the pre-integration era. Most notably,
       he will organize the Negro National League, the first
       lasting professional league for African American ball
       players, which will operate from 1920 to 1931. He will
       adopted his longtime nickname "Rube" as his official
       middle name later in life. He will join the ancestors on
       December 9, 1930 and will be posthumously elected to the
       Baseball Hall of Fame in 1981.

1956 - African American students are admitted to a Clay, Kentucky
       elementary school under National Guard protection. They
       had previously been barred by local authorities on
       September 12.

1962 - The Justice Department files the first suit to end racial
       segregation in public schools. The fourth African American
       church is burned near Dawson, Georgia. Three white men
       later admitted burning the church. They were sentenced to
       seven year prison terms.

1973 - Illinois becomes the first state to honor Dr. Martin Luther
       King, Jr.'s birthday as a holiday.

1983 - Vanessa Williams, Miss New York State, is named Miss
       America in Atlantic City, New Jersey, the first African
       American winner in the history of the pageant. Williams
       will relinquish her crown after a 1984 scandal and later
       stage a remarkable comeback through a stellar recording
       career, which will include her multimillion-selling album,
       "The Right Stuff".

1990 - "The Content of Our Character" is published by San Jose
       State University professor Shelby Steele. The book will
       attract controversy because of its provocative positions
       on affirmative action and race relations and win a 1992
       National Book Award.

1991 - Ground is broken for the Harold Washington wing of the
       DuSable Museum in Chicago, Illinois. Founded by artist
       and poet Margaret T. Burroughs in 1961, the DuSable is
       one of the oldest African American museums in the United
       States.

1994 - As some 20 warships sit off the coast of Haiti, former
       President Jimmy Carter, Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) and
       retired Gen. Colin Powell arrive in the Caribbean nation
       in an 11th-hour bid to avert a U.S.-led invasion.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/18
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2011, 03:13:44 pm »
1850 - Congress passes the Fugitive Slave Act, a part of the
       Compromise of 1850, which allows slave owners to reclaim
       slaves who had escaped to other states. The act also
       offers federal officers a fee for captured slaves.

1895 - Booker T. Washington makes a speech at the Cotton States
       and International Exposition in Atlanta, Georgia. Known
       as the "Atlanta Compromise" speech, Washington advocates
       acceptance of a subordinate role for African Americans,
       espouses peaceful coexistence with white Southerners,
       and calls agitation over the question of social equality
       "the extremist folly."  The speech, which reportedly
       leaves some African American listeners in tears and will
       incur the wrath of W.E.B. Du Bois and others, secures
       Washington's reputation among whites as a successor to
       Frederick Douglass.

1945 - 1000 white students walk out of three Gary, Indiana
       schools to protest integration.  There were similar
       disturbances in Chicago, Illinois and other Northern and
       Western metropolitan areas.

1948 - Dr. Ralph J. Bunche is confirmed by the United Nations
       Security Council as acting United Nations' mediator in
       Palestine.

1951 - Dr. Benjamin Solomon Carson, Sr., neurosurgeon, is born
       in Detroit, Michigan.  He will graduate from the
       University of Michigan Medical School in 1977 and will
       become the first African American neurosurgery resident
       at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.
       He will receive the American Black Achievement Award
       from Ebony and the Paul Harris Fellow Award from Rotary
       International. He will become best known for his
       separation of Siamese twins in 1989.

1962 - Rwanda, Burundi, Jamaica & Trinidad-Tobago are admitted
       (105th-108th countries) to the United Nations.

1967 - Ricky Bell, rhythm-and-blues singer, (Bell Biv Devoe and
       New Edition), is born.

1970 - Rock guitarist Jimi (James Marshall) Hendrix joins the
       ancestors at age 27 after aspirating on his own vomit
       in London.  Contrary to many news accounts, he did not
       succumb to a drug overdose. No trace of drugs was found
       in his body. A self-taught musician who blended rock,
       jazz, and blues with British avant-garde rock, Hendrix
       redefined the use of the electric guitar.  His musical
       career deeply influenced modern musicians. His songs,
       "Purple Haze" and "Foxy Lady" will become anthems for a
       generation at war in Vietnam.

1971 – Jada Pinkett smith, actress/author/musician famous for her roles in tv shows like Different World and Hawthorne as well as movies like Menance 2 Society, Jason’s Lyric and the Matrix sequels was born. She was also close to rapper 2pac Shakur when they both attended a Baltimore School of Recording Arts and married one of the most successful actors of all time and hip hop artist Will Smith

1980 - Cosmonaut Arnaldo Tamayo-Mendez, a Cuban, becomes the
       first person of African descent sent on a mission in
       space (Soyuz 38).
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/19
« Reply #26 on: September 19, 2011, 04:40:22 pm »
1865 - Atlanta University is founded.

1868 - White Democrats attack demonstrators, who are marching
       from Albany to Camilla, Georgia, and kill nine African
       Americans. Several whites are wounded.

1931 - Benjamin Franklin Peay is born in Camden, South Carolina.
       He will become a rhythm and blues singer better known as
       Brook Benton. He  will amass 16 gold records and be best
       known for the songs "A Rainy Night in Georgia" and "It's
       Just a Matter of Time." He will join the ancestors on
       April 9, 1988.

1945 - Freda Charcelia Payne is born in Detroit, Michigan. She
       will become a singer whose hits will include "Band of
       Gold" in 1970.

1956 - The first international conference of Black Writers &
       Artists meets at the Sorbonne, in Paris, France.

1981 - More than 300,000 demonstrators from labor and civil
       rights organizations protest the social policies of the
       Reagan administration in a Solidarity Day March in
       Washington, DC.

1989 - Gordon Parks's film "The Learning Tree" is selected among
       the first films to be registered by the National Film
       Registry of the Library of Congress. The National Film
       Registry was formed by an act of Congress the previous
       year to recognize films that are "culturally,
       historically, or aesthetically significant."  Parks's
       1969 movie joins other classic films such as
       "Casablanca," "Gone With the Wind," and "The Wizard of
       Oz."

1989 - The first issue of Emerge magazine goes on sale.  Emerge,
       founded by Wilmer C. Ames, Jr., covers domestic and
       international news and issues from an African American
       perspective.

1994 - U.S. troops peacefully enter Haiti to enforce the return
       of exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/20
« Reply #27 on: September 20, 2011, 12:29:31 pm »
1664 - Maryland enacts the first anti-amalgamation law to prevent
       widespread intermarriage of English women and African
       American men. Other colonies passed similar laws:
       Virginia, 1691; Massachusetts 1705; North Carolina, 1715;
       South Carolina, 1717; Delaware, 1721; Pennsylvania, 1725.

1830 - The National Negro Convention, a group of 38 free African
       Americans from eight states, meets in Philadelphia,
       Pennsylvania, at the Bethel A.M.E. Church, with the
       express purpose of abolishing slavery and improving the
       social status of African Americans.  They will elect
       Richard Allen president and agree to boycott slave-
       produced goods.

1847 - William A. Leidesdorff is elected to San Francisco town
       council receiving the third highest vote.  Leidesdorff,
       who was one of the first African American elected
       officials, becomes the town treasurer in 1848.

1850 - Slave trade is abolished in Washington, DC, but slavery
       will be allowed to continue until 1862.

1885 - Ferdinand Joseph La Menthe ("Jelly Roll" Morton) is born
       in Gulfport (New Orleans), Louisiana. He will become a
       renown jazz pianist and composer. Morton, whose fabulous
       series of 1938 recordings for the Library of Congress are
       a gold mine of information about early jazz, was a
       complex man. Vain, ambitious, and given to exaggeration,
       he was a pool shark, hustler and gambler, as well as a
       brilliant pianist and composer.  His greatest talent,
       perhaps was for organizing and arranging.  The series of
       records he made with his "Red Hot Peppers" between 1926
       and 1928 stands, alongside King Oliver's as the crowning
       glory of the New Orleans tradition and one of the great
       achievements in Jazz.

1915 - Hughie Lee-Smith is born in Eustis, Florida. He will
       become a painter known for such surrealistic landscapes
       as "Man with Balloons", "Man Standing on His Head" and
       "Big Brother".

1943 - Sani Abacha is born in Kano, Nigeria.  After being educated
       in his home state, will become a soldier and go to England
       for advanced military education. He will achieve many
       promotions as a soldier and by the mid-1980s, will enter
       Nigeria's military elite. In 1983 he will be among those
       who will overthrow Shehu Shagari, leader of the Second
       Republic, in a coup which led to the military rule of
       Muhammadu Buhari. In 1985, Abacha will participate in a
       second coup, which will replace Buhari with General
       Ibrahim Babangida. As head of state, Babangida will
       announce that free elections will be held in the early
       1990s. In 1993, however, after Babangida nullifies the
       results of these belated free elections, Abacha will
       stage a third coup and oust his former ally. His regime
       will be characterized by a concern with security that
       verges on paranoia.  Abacha will schedule elections for
       August, 1998, but months beforehand, all five legal
       parties nominate him as their "consensus candidate."  In
       June, 1998, Abacha will join the ancestors when he dies
       unexpectedly of a heart attack.

1958 - Martin Luther King Jr. is stabbed in the chest by a
       deranged African American woman while he is autographing
       books in a Harlem department store.  The woman is placed
       under mental observation.

1962 - Mississippi's governor, Ross Barnett, personally refuses
       to admit James Meredith to University of Mississippi as
       its first African American student. (Meredith is later
       admitted.)

1962 - The Zimbabwe African People's Union (ZAPU) is banned in an
       order issued by Sir Edgar Whitehead, the prime minister of
       Southern Rhodesia.

1973 - Willie Mays announces his retirement from major league
       baseball at the end of the 1973 baseball season.

1979 - A bloodless coup overthrows Jean-Bedel Bokassa, self-styled
       head of the Central African Empire, in a French-supported
       coup while he is visiting Libya.

1984 - NBC-TV debuts "The Cosby Show".  Bill Cosby plays Dr.
       Heathcliff (Cliff) Huxtable. His lovely wife, Clair, is
       played by Phylicia Rashad.  The Huxtable kids were Sondra,
       age 20 (Sabrina Le Beauf), Denise, age 16 (Lisa Bonet),
       Theodore, age 14 (Malcom-Jamal Warner), Vanessa, age 8
       (Tempestt Bledsoe) and Rudy, age 5 (Keshia Knight Pulliam).
       The premiere is the most watched show of the week and the
       show goes on to become an Emmy Award-winner and one of the
       most popular on television for eight years. The series,
       which had been rejected by other network television
       executives, will become one of the most popular in
       television history.

1999 - Lawrence Russell Brewer becomes the second white supremacist
       to be convicted in the dragging death of James Byrd Jr. in
       Jasper, Texas. He will be later sentenced to death.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/21
« Reply #28 on: September 22, 2011, 03:36:28 pm »
Belize Independence Day
International Day of Peace

1814 - African American troops are cited for bravery in the
       Battle of New Orleans.

1872 - John Henry Conyers of South Carolina becomes first
       African American student at U.S. Naval Academy
       (Annapolis).  He will later resign.

1905 - The Atlanta Life Insurance Company is founded by Alonzo
       F. Herndon.

1909 - Kwame Nkrumah is born in Nkroful, Ghana.  A leader in
       African colonial liberation, Nkrumah will be the first
       prime minister of Ghana (1958-1966), but will be forced
       into exile following a coup.

1932 - Melvin Van Peebles, playwright and director(Watermelon
       Man), is born.

1967 - Walter Washington is nominated by President Lyndon B.
       Johnson as the first mayor of the newly reorganized
       municipal government of Washington, DC. In 1974, he
       will be elected to the post, another first for an
       African American.

1981 - Belize gains independence from Great Britain.
1989 - Army General Colin Powell receives Senate confirmation as
       Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the highest
       military position in the United States, thereby becoming
       the military's highest-ranking African American.

2008 – President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa resigns from office

2009 - The Rev. John "Bootsie" Wilson, a former lead singer and
       last surviving member of the soul group The Silhouettes,
       joins the ancestors at the age of 69.

2011 – Two people on deathrow were killed, the first Lawrence Brewer in Texas was a white supremacist and former member of the KKK convicted of being a part of the racial motivated dragging and death of a black man named James Byrd Jr., the other was Troy Davis in GA who was convicted of the murder of a Georgia policeman in 1989. 7 of the 9 people who originally “eyewitnessed” him as the one who pulled the trigger recanted their story and said they were coerced by policeman to identify Davis as the shooter.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali

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9/22
« Reply #29 on: September 22, 2011, 04:40:03 pm »
9/22

Mali Independence Day

1828 – Zulu leader Shaka the Great was assassinated

1853 - George Washington Murray is born a slave near Rembert,
       South Carolina. A two-term congressman from his home
       state, Murray will also be an inventor and holder of
       eight patents for agricultural tools. He will join the
       ancestors on April 21, 1926.

1862 - Five days after Union forces won the Battle of Antietam,
       President Lincoln issues a preliminary emancipation
       proclamation.  It states that if the rebelling states
       did not return to the Union by January 1, 1863, he
       would declare their slaves to be "forever free."

1904 – The city of Boley located in Oklahoma was established by African Americans

1906 - Race riots occur in Atlanta, Georgia, killing 21 people.

1915 - Xavier University of Louisiana opens in New Orleans, the
       first Catholic college for African Americans in the
       United States.

1941 - Chester Lovelle Talton is born in Eldorado, Arkansas. At
       49, he will become the first African American
       Episcopalian bishop to be ordained in the western
       United States. As suffragan bishop of the diocese of Los
        Angeles, he becomes the religious leader of
       Episcopalians in the fourth-largest diocese in the
       United States.

1950 - Dr. Ralph J. Bunche, director of the UN Trusteeship
       division and former professor of political science at
       Howard University, is awarded the Nobel Peace prize for
       successful mediation of the Palestinian peace accord.

1954 - Shari Belafonte (Harper, now Behrens) is born in New York
       City, New York. She will become is an American actress,
       model, writer and singer. The daughter of singer Harry
       Belafonte, she will be best known for her role as Julie
       Gilette on the 1980s television series "Hotel" and as a
       spokesperson for the diet supplement "Slim-Fast" during
       the 1990s.

1960 - The Republic of Mali proclaims its independence.

1961 - The Interstate Commerce Commission issues regulation
       prohibiting segregation on interstate buses and in
       terminal facilities.

1985 - Robert Guillaume wins an Emmy for best leading actor in a
       comedy for Benson while The Cosby Show wins for best
       comedy series.

1989 - Edward Perkins, the first African American ambassador to
       the Republic of South Africa, becomes director-general of
       the United States Foreign Service. The first African
       American named to the post, Perkins will be credited with
       bringing more minorities into the foreign service.
"Don't count the days, make the days count"-Muhammad Ali