Author Topic: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love  (Read 93759 times)

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #135 on: December 11, 2006, 09:36:25 am »
I'm not sure which is more bizarre, the dude accusing you of being racist out of the blue or the embarrassed "black" people.  WTF.

As for the royal couple's backstory, you didn't mention the Storm mini.  I reckon you had your reasons. 
Also, a teeny, tiny point -- Ross shows up in BP #1 in the briefing.  He's the one that tells them about BP whooping Cap.

Anyway, thanks for an amusing little stroll through the crazy.  Seems like you have a good time with it.
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Offline PantherNotCarolina

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #136 on: December 11, 2006, 11:11:43 am »
Annnnnd they're off! Look at 'em wank, everybody!!!


I hate how everyone keeps regurgating the whole, ''Hudlin said people who don't like mah book are racist'' bile.  Hudlin never said it.  Don't you find it amazing that no one can ever find proof of this?  Like how no one could find proof that Tommy Hilfiger said racist things on Oprah or Lauryn Hill saying racist things on MTV?  It just simply isn't true.  I also like how people think that because you support Hudlin, you're either racist or actually Hudlin himself.  Some more bull for everyone's plate.  Even if people hate the book because it's bad, doesn't mean that other people don't like it.  Myself for instance.  I like the new Blue Beetle series, but I know that alot of people online despise it.  Do I care?  No.

Offline BlackRodimus

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #137 on: December 11, 2006, 11:33:22 am »
OH WAH WAH STORM N FORGE ARE two luv!!!!

GOD, the annual was so f*cking terrible. Thank God it doesn't add up in Hudlin's timeline, so as far as I'm concerned, it never happened. Let's not even talk about all that Storm/Forge caressing and kissing just to make the white people so happy. Oh, and Storm "tried to seduce a surfer boy"? Wow, looks like writers lie as much as fanboys do! And she was "damaged goods"? Again, THANK GOD for Reggie Hudlin. I'm so pissed off that I'm almost shaking. God, I'm a nerd.


Continuing to practice self-restraint here, so I won't say what I'd like about those whiny fanguy/gals posting their pathetic pap to the forum you've shared with us, Jenn. I will only say that it always does my heart good to read their stupid perceptions of the wreck Storm's "Forge involvement" was as compared to the beautiful and natural love relationship Storm now shares with the Panther. Yes. I love reading their bitter lamentations. Love it. I'd rub salt into their wounds if it were possible to do so  :)

I am fresh from another excursion to the CBR board. It was fun  :) My post total stands at a perfect "80" there now. As this is the case, it will likely be many a moon before I post again there. I like my "8'. I encountered a few "Hudlin-haters while there, one of whom paid me the supreme compliment by asking if I were "Reggie Hudlin". The same nitwit asked me - after I had suggested that as a well-traveled black man who was knowledeable of the different layers of "culture" and "expression" that exists within the African-American community, that Hudlin's "take" on Luke Cage was the most authentic to date - if Hudlin had any experience writing "royalty". The dope was probably attempting a criticism of Hudlin's writing of T'Challa. I was ignoring his posts at that point by not replying to his questions and statements. However, if I hadn't, I would have asked him, how much experience - if any, Stan Lee had writing "gods". I would have asked him and those other narrow-minded, knee-jerk Hudlin-haters, why the Norse gods and the Greek (Olympian) gods all sounded alike.

Those fanboys have a fit when Storm or T'Challa utter an African-American phrase...[it seems that above all else, those whiny fanboys/gals do NOT want Storm and T'Challa (Storm especially), interacting with or speaking like African Americans]...but it doesn't seem to bother them when a Greek god speaks in the exact same way as a Norwegian god.

Hypocrites.

You're right, Jenn. Thank goodness for Reginald Hudlin and his bold, effective, accurate and interesting portrayal of ALL of Marvel's black superheroes. Another "everybody" accused me of calling "everybody" racist.  :D "Everybody" is so predictable. So let them complain and lament Storm's marriage to the Panther. If Ororo was so in love with Forge, why did she attempt to stab him? I wish she had succeeded. And once again Jenn, let me take this opportunity to thank you for forewarning me about that X-Men Annual. That would have been one comicbook I'd have happily and quickly thrown into the trash if I'd purchased it.

Having seen the total "right-ness" between T'Challa and Ororo, viewing those illustrations of Forge with his arms and hands all over Ororo is enough to induce violent vomiting. I'd like to welcome the newest member to the HEF...I believe the name is "BPStorm4ever". The name is well-chosen and expresses my sentiments exactly for any RoLo, RoFo or mofo  :D, to see.


Apologies for not noticing this much earlier. Many thanks, as well as thanks to everyone for making me feel welcome. :)

And if I can respond to the rest of this post...Forge deserves Mystique. This...Xavier-lite wanted to have someone INVADE STORM'S MIND instead of waiting to see if she said yes or no. Still irks me to this day. So when he got with Mystique (they at least shared a kiss, not sure if they slept together), I wasn't surprised or shocked, and thought he deserved it. But then again, this was when he was using PAIN COLLARS to keep her and Sabretooth in check, too. Sounds like a controlling man to me, totally unworthy of Storm.
"don't fight the power, be the power" - Reginald Hudlin

Jenn

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #138 on: December 11, 2006, 11:50:47 am »
Even if people hate the book because it's bad, doesn't mean that other people don't like it.  Myself for instance.  I like the new Blue Beetle series, but I know that alot of people online despise it.  Do I care?  No.

What annoys me is this.

Fanboy: I don't like Panther.
Me: I like Panther
Fanboy: OMGWTFBBQ!!11 Only an IDIOT can like Panther! You justify yourself to me NOWNOWNOWRIGHTNOWNEGRONOW!!!111

Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #139 on: December 11, 2006, 12:01:34 pm »
Even if people hate the book because it's bad, doesn't mean that other people don't like it.  Myself for instance.  I like the new Blue Beetle series, but I know that alot of people online despise it.  Do I care?  No.

What annoys me is this.

Fanboy: I don't like Panther.
Me: I like Panther
Fanboy: OMGWTFBBQ!!11 Only an IDIOT can like Panther! You justify yourself to me NOWNOWNOWRIGHTNOWNEGRONOW!!!111

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH!!1 Do you see why we love us some Jenn now?
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
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Offline BlackRodimus

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #140 on: December 11, 2006, 12:04:08 pm »
Even if people hate the book because it's bad, doesn't mean that other people don't like it.  Myself for instance.  I like the new Blue Beetle series, but I know that alot of people online despise it.  Do I care?  No.

What annoys me is this.

Fanboy: I don't like Panther.
Me: I like Panther
Fanboy: OMGWTFBBQ!!11 Only an IDIOT can like Panther! You justify yourself to me NOWNOWNOWRIGHTNOWNEGRONOW!!!111

Pretty much what brought me here, to avoid that. ;) Its either that or some version of "I don't like Panther, so you must think I'm racist. Hudlin does!"  ::)
"don't fight the power, be the power" - Reginald Hudlin

Offline Wise Son

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #141 on: December 12, 2006, 04:33:16 am »
I'm not sure which is more bizarre, the dude accusing you of being racist out of the blue or the embarrassed "black" people.  WTF.
Yeah, Jenn, why aren't you more of a credit to your people, especially seeing as how you are now the representative of real Black people on the internet?
If I may, why's he keep calling you
Quote
the chick that called Martin Luther King Jr. a retard and said the idea of racial harmony was bullsh*t.
?
He really is spectacularly condescending.

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #142 on: December 12, 2006, 01:21:56 pm »
That dude is known all over LiveJournal as being a douche. He's been banned from communities far and wide. Just a real nutter overall. Did you get to see his whole "black people love me!" thing?

Offline mariah

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #143 on: December 12, 2006, 08:21:20 pm »
I'm not sure which is more bizarre, the dude accusing you of being racist out of the blue or the embarrassed "black" people.  WTF.
Yeah, Jenn, why aren't you more of a credit to your people, especially seeing as how you are now the representative of real Black people on the internet?
If I may, why's he keep calling you
Quote
the chick that called Martin Luther King Jr. a retard and said the idea of racial harmony was bullsh*t.
?
He really is spectacularly condescending.

Someone actually had the nerve to say that to you?  Oh hell no.

Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #144 on: December 14, 2006, 12:15:22 pm »
I'm not sure which is more bizarre, the dude accusing you of being racist out of the blue or the embarrassed "black" people.  WTF.
Yeah, Jenn, why aren't you more of a credit to your people, especially seeing as how you are now the representative of real Black people on the internet?
If I may, why's he keep calling you
Quote
the chick that called Martin Luther King Jr. a retard and said the idea of racial harmony was bullsh*t.
?
He really is spectacularly condescending.


"Oh hell no."Someone actually had the nerve to say that to you?  Oh hell no.

^^^^---we officially love you,mariah...
« Last Edit: December 17, 2006, 07:21:58 pm by supreme illuminati »
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw

lovecrafty

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #145 on: December 17, 2006, 06:21:34 pm »
If I may, why's he keep calling you
Quote
the chick that called Martin Luther King Jr. a retard and said the idea of racial harmony was bullsh*t.
?

As it turns out, I was misremembering the conversation.  She only said that Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream of a world without racism was "sh*t", she didn't actually call him a retard.  It was in the context of a conversation she was having with several other people.  She made a dismissive and racist comment about an Asian member of the forum (calling him "yella", which means cowardly, because he is Asian and hence "yellow") while also attacking a (white) member for some racist comments he was making, and I suggested that her argument would seem less hypocritical if she were not engaging in racism at the exact same time she was decrying it in others.  That lead us to this:


Where she calls the very idea of racial harmony "sh*t", and laughingly dismisses even the possibility that she might be racist while calling me a "crackaasscracka".  Which doesn't really offend me, but does make me sort of chuckle at her hypocrisy.

Also, someone else in this thread claim that Hudlin never said people who don't like his BP were racist.  He did, in fact.  The comment that offended me most was when he said, and this is a direct quote "White fans who complain about continuity just hate the idea of a strong black character."  This was only one of many similiar comments, and such personal slams have no place in a discussion of comics.  continutity is a big issues with fans, and EVERY writer gets slammed for continuity errors.    He has since deleted the forum those comments were hosted at, and they are lost to time.  I had a conversation with Mr. Hudlin myself, and he was both rude and dismissive.  I very much wanted to enjoy his Black Panther -- one of my favorite characters -- but I can't in good conscience support any writer in the comic's industry that is so rudely dismissive of fan concerns.  In particular, my issues with his run all stem from his -- I fee poorly thought out -- decision to retcon the Wakandans as having been an advanced society with super-technology before the Industrial Revolution.  I feel this was a poor decision because it creates three intractable problems for the Black Panther mythos.

1. There is no plausible way to explain the advancement of the Wakandans without resorting to alien intervention.  This makes the Wakandans other-than-human, in the same way that the Inhumans, Atlanteans and Eternals.  Furthermore, because the history of Africa in the Marvel Universe mirrors that of the real world, this means the Wakandans sat by and did absolutely nothing to help the rest of Africa despite slavery, colonization, plagues, and poverty-induced warfare.  This means that post-Hudlin, the Wakandans are not longer entirely human and incredible assholes.

2.  Wakanda was originally bootstrapped into the 21st century almost entirely by the sole efforts of T'Challa, a genius on par with Tony Stark, Reed Richards, and Doctor Doom.  In fact, one of the grat appeals of the Black Panther character is that he is  a super-geniuses.  However, post-Hudlin, T'Challa is no longer a super-genius.  He is now merely a smart member of an extremely advanced society -- a society he played no role in creating.  I feel this greatly and pointlessly diminishes the character.

At this point, to redeem the character Hudlin needs to send him back through time and reveal that T'Challa was in fact the first Black Panther, and started the Wakanadan line of succession, as well as giving them super-tech.  Even this wouldn't change the fact that the Wakandans could have saved millions of Africans from lives of hardship and desperation, but were apparently too xenophobic to lift a finger to help their neighbors in the slightest.  I guess the lesson we're supposed to learn from this is that Africans don't get along with other Africans?

Offline Yaw

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #146 on: December 17, 2006, 06:45:55 pm »
Quote
1. There is no plausible way to explain the advancement of the Wakandans without resorting to alien intervention.  This makes the Wakandans other-than-human, in the same way that the Inhumans, Atlanteans and Eternals.  Furthermore, because the history of Africa in the Marvel Universe mirrors that of the real world, this means the Wakandans sat by and did absolutely nothing to help the rest of Africa despite slavery, colonization, plagues, and poverty-induced warfare.  This means that post-Hudlin, the Wakandans are not longer entirely human and incredible assholes.

Nowhere does Hudlin present Wakanda as having "supertechnology" before the Western Industrial Revolution. Wakandans not aiding other AFricans during the the Age of European imperialism means that Wakandans were just like other AFricans in real life who saw themselves according to their tribal/national identities and not by race.  Thanks for further acknowledging that white people are more hung up on race than Blacks ever have been.  To Wakandans, EVERYONE who is not Wakandan is an outsider.

Quote
2.  Wakanda was originally bootstrapped into the 21st century almost entirely by the sole efforts of T'Challa, a genius on par with Tony Stark, Reed Richards, and Doctor Doom.  In fact, one of the grat appeals of the Black Panther character is that he is  a super-geniuses.  However, post-Hudlin, T'Challa is no longer a super-genius.  He is now merely a smart member of an extremely advanced society -- a society he played no role in creating.  I feel this greatly and pointlessly diminishes the character.

Again thanks for this.  According to you, T'Challa is diminished for not being the great giver of European knowledge to his people and thereby advancing it until the 21st century.  Oh would would Africans do if it weren't for Europeans?  No by Wakanda being advanced already only further shows that Wakanda is a greater kingdom than we though before.  T'Challa isn't diminished in the slightest.  Instead of being a super genius of European standards, he is a super genius of Wakandan standards. 

Thanks for showing how much the European mindset truly believes that no human can advance beyond themselves even in fiction.  Then again the Black inferiority that is endemic in American society makes your comments understandable.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2006, 06:49:12 pm by Yaw »

Offline KamiKaZee

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #147 on: December 17, 2006, 07:19:10 pm »
Also, someone else in this thread claim that Hudlin never said people who don't like his BP were racist.  He did, in fact.  The comment that offended me most was when he said, and this is a direct quote "White fans who complain about continuity just hate the idea of a strong black character."  This was only one of many similiar comments, and such personal slams have no place in a discussion of comics.  continutity is a big issues with fans, and EVERY writer gets slammed for continuity errors.    He has since deleted the forum those comments were hosted at, and they are lost to time.  I had a conversation with Mr. Hudlin myself, and he was both rude and dismissive.  I very much wanted to enjoy his Black Panther -- one of my favorite characters -- but I can't in good conscience support any writer in the comic's industry that is so rudely dismissive of fan concerns.  In particular, my issues with his run all stem from his -- I fee poorly thought out -- decision to retcon the Wakandans as having been an advanced society with super-technology before the Industrial Revolution.  I feel this was a poor decision because it creates three intractable problems for the Black Panther mythos.

1. There is no plausible way to explain the advancement of the Wakandans without resorting to alien intervention.  This makes the Wakandans other-than-human, in the same way that the Inhumans, Atlanteans and Eternals.  Furthermore, because the history of Africa in the Marvel Universe mirrors that of the real world, this means the Wakandans sat by and did absolutely nothing to help the rest of Africa despite slavery, colonization, plagues, and poverty-induced warfare.  This means that post-Hudlin, the Wakandans are not longer entirely human and incredible assholes.

2.  Wakanda was originally bootstrapped into the 21st century almost entirely by the sole efforts of T'Challa, a genius on par with Tony Stark, Reed Richards, and Doctor Doom.  In fact, one of the grat appeals of the Black Panther character is that he is  a super-geniuses.  However, post-Hudlin, T'Challa is no longer a super-genius.  He is now merely a smart member of an extremely advanced society -- a society he played no role in creating.  I feel this greatly and pointlessly diminishes the character.

At this point, to redeem the character Hudlin needs to send him back through time and reveal that T'Challa was in fact the first Black Panther, and started the Wakanadan line of succession, as well as giving them super-tech.  Even this wouldn't change the fact that the Wakandans could have saved millions of Africans from lives of hardship and desperation, but were apparently too xenophobic to lift a finger to help their neighbors in the slightest.  I guess the lesson we're supposed to learn from this is that Africans don't get along with other Africans?

Hudlin is rude and dismissive to his fans?  I doubt it.  But you aren't a fan anyway, are you? 
In case you didn't know it, attitude begets attitude and respect brings respect.  What goes
around comes around.  Try being nice to ppl and maybe they'll be nice to you.

If you feel that strongly about the storyline, perhaps you should consider submitting your
résumé for Marvel Entertainments' consideration ::)



If All You Do Is What You've Done, Then All You'll Get Is What You've Got.

lovecrafty

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #148 on: December 17, 2006, 07:20:47 pm »
Nowhere does Hudlin present Wakanda as having "supertechnology" before the Western Industrial Revolution.

Black Panther #1, page 15.  Scene is listed as occurring during the 19th century (1800s).  Wakandans use a large buzzing device with a Kirbyesque design.  The device causes flintlock rifles to fail to fire -- altering chemical properties of gunpower at a distance with a machine that goes "bzzzt"?  Sounds like super-technology to me.  Perhaps this is actually at the end of the IR, but it doesn;t change the point that now post-Hudlin T'Challa was born into a society that had already mastered super-technology  -- this of course raises the question "Was T'Challa educated in American colleges?"  That would make little or no sense, given that Wakanda is far more advanced than America, yet he must have done so (unless Hudlin has just completely destroyed the continuity of every writer who touched BP before him).

Quote
Wakandans not aiding other AFricans during the the Age of European imperialism means that Wakandans were just like other AFricans in real life who saw themselves according to their tribal/national identities and not by race.  Thanks for further acknowledging that white people are more hung up on race than Blacks ever have been.  To Wakandans, EVERYONE who is not Wakandan is an outsider.

I never said it was a race issue.  The simple fact is that no isolationist, xenophobic society could ever possibiliy be more advanced than open, trading nations.  Europe achieved technological dominance over the rest of the world precisely because trade within Europe pushed development and spurred innovation.  It took the knowledge of an entire continent in trade with several other continents to make the industrial revolution happen, but somehow a very small, completely isolated population managed to be hundreds of years ahead of the next most developed societies on Earth?  That's ridiculous.

There is simply no way -- barring alien intervention -- the Wakandans could be as isolationist as portrayed and as advanced as portrayed.  And considering the ease with which they could have saved the rest of Africa, it does make them appear to be both callous and inhuman.  Clealry they must have known what sort of horrors were happening right beyond their jungle, and surely they had the power to prevent it.  With great power comes what?  Great responsibility.  Any explanation you could give for this behavior will inevitably make the Wakandans appear xenophobic and morally retarded, surprising attributes for a supposedly advanced society.

Quote
According to you, T'Challa is diminished for not being the great giver of European knowledge to his people and thereby advancing it until the 21st century.

Super-technology is not "European knowledge", it's a fantastic element of comic books.  T'Challa is diminished when his invention of the "technological jungle" (seen first in FF #52) -- a distinctly African vision of the application of super-technology -- is removed from continuity and replaced with a Wakanda that was super-advanced while the rest of the world was just mastering the steam engine.

Quote
Instead of being a super genius of European standards, he is a super genius of Wakandan standards. 

There is no evidence that Black Panther is any smarter than the average Wakandan.

Quote
Thanks for showing how much the European mindset truly believes that no human can advance beyond themselves even in fiction.  Then again the Black inferiority that is endemic in American society makes your comments understandable.

lol.  You're desperately fishing to turn this into a racial thing.  I don't even know what you're trying to get at with this comment, but it's funny.

Offline Yaw

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Re: Black Panther: Hudlin, Storm, & the fear of (real) black love
« Reply #149 on: December 17, 2006, 07:59:21 pm »

Quote
Black Panther #1, page 15.  Scene is listed as occurring during the 19th century (1800s).  Wakandans use a large buzzing device with a Kirbyesque design.  The device causes flintlock rifles to fail to fire -- altering chemical properties of gunpower at a distance with a machine that goes "bzzzt"?  Sounds like super-technology to me.  Perhaps this is actually at the end of the IR, but it doesn;t change the point that now post-Hudlin T'Challa was born into a society that had already mastered super-technology  -- this of course raises the question "Was T'Challa educated in American colleges?"  That would make little or no sense, given that Wakanda is far more advanced than America, yet he must have done so (unless Hudlin has just completely destroyed the continuity of every writer who touched BP before him).

yes 1800s.  The European Industrial Revolution started in the late 18th century. One of the weapons they used was the Gatling Gun which was created in 1861.  The Gatling Guns were first used against South Africans in 1879 during the Anglo-Zulu War (as they stated that they had been together during the "South African campaign."  Therefore the Industrial Revolution had already made its impact on the world by then.  Try again. 

Quote
I never said it was a race issue.  The simple fact is that no isolationist, xenophobic society could ever possibiliy be more advanced than open, trading nations.  Europe achieved technological dominance over the rest of the world precisely because trade within Europe pushed development and spurred innovation.  It took the knowledge of an entire continent in trade with several other continents to make the industrial revolution happen, but somehow a very small, completely isolated population managed to be hundreds of years ahead of the next most developed societies on Earth?  That's ridiculous.

This is a comic book.  Furthermore, being isolationist doesn't mean that they know nothing about the outside world.  It has been well-established that Wakanda sends spies outside of the country who report bring back information to the country.  This is Wakanda not Japan which is a series of islands in the ocean.  Wakanda isn't naturally cut off from the world.

Quote
There is simply no way -- barring alien intervention -- the Wakandans could be as isolationist as portrayed and as advanced as portrayed.  And considering the ease with which they could have saved the rest of Africa, it does make them appear to be both callous and inhuman.  Clealry they must have known what sort of horrors were happening right beyond their jungle, and surely they had the power to prevent it.  With great power comes what?  Great responsibility.  Any explanation you could give for this behavior will inevitably make the Wakandans appear xenophobic and morally retarded, surprising attributes for a supposedly advanced society.

No again it makes them as if they do not care about non-Wakandans.  A society as old as Wakanda would probably realize that kingdoms come and go.  Getting involved with others problems is futile but they do seem cold and callous from an outsider's perspective.  I think that is the point of T'Challa.  T'Challa has always been presented as someone who is knowledgeable of outsider problems.  I think Hudlin is using T'Challa to be more sympathetic to the plight of other's in outworlder politics.  T'Challa realizes the world is f*cked and is trying to do something about it to an extent.

Quote
Super-technology is not "European knowledge", it's a fantastic element of comic books.  T'Challa is diminished when his invention of the "technological jungle" (seen first in FF #52) -- a distinctly African vision of the application of super-technology -- is removed from continuity and replaced with a Wakanda that was super-advanced while the rest of the world was just mastering the steam engine.


Has the techno-jungle even been featured yet?  We have no clue if it exists in the current run or not.  The assumption is that it exists until it is acknowledged as removed from continuity.  The techno-jungle was not frequently acknowledged in PRiest's run either.  It was NEVER acknowledged in MAcGregrors run. 

Quote
There is no evidence that Black Panther is any smarter than the average Wakandan.

And there was in Priests run?  LAst time I checked T'Challa used legions of scientists to get things done throughout PRiest's run (punching through Mephisto's hear for example).  His intelligence was shown through his craftiness.  As it stands now, Hudlin's  run has stressed T'Challa's diplomacy and craftiness more than anything up until now.  WE shall see what happens in future runs.  But this alone is enough to suggest that T'Challa is more than the average Wakandan.

Quote
lol.  You're desperately fishing to turn this into a racial thing.  I don't even know what you're trying to get at with this comment, but it's funny.


No Im not trying to turn it into a racial thing but rather a cultural thing.