Author Topic: Are Police Disrespectful?  (Read 5760 times)

Offline Stringer

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Are Police Disrespectful?
« on: November 28, 2006, 04:49:15 pm »
Police reprimanded over email

LONDON (Reuters) - One hundred police officers and staff have been disciplined for circulating an email showing an image of a decapitated black man, police said on Tuesday.

Fifteen of the most senior officers and staff at Hertfordshire Police were given formal reprimands, or the civilian equivalent, for distributing the message.

Another 85 were disciplined with either a formal warning or management advice.

The email contained a series of images, originating from the United States, entitled "Do not run from the police".


They purported to show a black suspect running from the police and then attempting to jump from a flyover on to a nearby building.

In the images, he falls between the two, decapitating himself on some railings. The final image is of the man's head on the railings' spikes.

Hertfordshire Police said it had mounted a five-month "robust" investigation into the distribution of the email, under the supervision of the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

"I am disappointed by the conduct of officers and staff who distributed this inappropriate image that some people may have perceived as being racist," said Deputy Chief Constable Simon Ash, who oversaw the investigation.

"Through this investigation we have been able to clearly re-state the high standards of conduct required from everyone who works for us - this is no less than our public should expect and demand of us."


A total of 400 officers and staff at the force received the email, 300 of whom simply deleted it, police said.

The president of the Black Police Association, Keith Jarrett, said disciplinary action should have gone further.

"I don't think a robust enough sanction has been taken against the officers concerned, especially the supervisory ones," he said.

"It is, at best, disrespectful to the black people that live in Hertfordshire."

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2006, 08:53:48 pm »
f*ck THE POLICE!!!!

(SOMEBODY had to say it!)

Offline Mastrmynd

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2006, 09:31:04 pm »
i've said it once, i'll say it again.. .it's been a baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad week for police in the US.


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Offline Open palm

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2006, 10:06:14 pm »
It's turning into a bad end for this year. All the negative vibes are emerging everywhere.  :-[

Anybody remember the sodomy case committed by New York cops years ago? I don't know if the Ghoul was mayor back then, but Lord - NYPD sodomizing a Black immigrant with a stick? That's really sick.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2006, 10:10:02 pm by Open palm »
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Offline Wise Son

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2006, 03:51:56 am »
i've said it once, i'll say it again.. .it's been a baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad week for police in the US.
*Hesitantly pointing out* Although the image originated in the US, this story is about UK cops. :-[

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Offline karaszero

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2006, 04:56:29 am »
True but the really sad part is there is NO seperation between your cops and ours they are all abusing their power and the very people to whom they are supposed to serve and protect are being victimized by the police

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2006, 06:28:51 am »
Oh man, at this rate, with stories like this, I'm going to have to start keeping a "barf bag" next to my computer.  This one literally makes me feel like throwing up.  How could ANYONE find images of a person decapitating himself funny?  Police or NOT police.

We hear these horrid stories (like the ones posted over the past couple of days on the forum) but ... are we talking about a few bad apples or a pervasive culture of racism or something in between?  This story, for example, as Wise Son points out, is out of the UK.  Do you all think racism was a factor in the police officers' fascination with this video, or is this story more of an example of the sick fascination some people have with viewing mutilation?  Or is it an example of the police dehumanizing criminals (irrespective of race)?

Whatever is going on here ... geeze ... what a way to start one's morning.  Gawd this is sickening.   :(

Offline Wise Son

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2006, 06:45:58 am »
I think there are some common factors and some local ones.

Positions of authority will always attract good, responsible people, but also arseholes who like being able to boss people around.

Some police forces might be less stringent in their recruitment. A friend of mine from Scotland said that the police there really were just stupid thugs, and he once got beaten until he puked by one of these guys for the crime of running away after they tried to arrest him for taking a piss in a park after dark.

I guess what I'm saying is that the role of being 'The Man' will mean there always will be some bad apples, but whether the entire organisation becomes rotten probably depends how high they can get in the chain of command.

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Offline Open palm

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2006, 07:09:24 am »
Oh man, at this rate, with stories like this, I'm going to have to start keeping a "barf bag" next to my computer.  This one literally makes me feel like throwing up.  How could ANYONE find images of a person decapitating himself funny?  Police or NOT police.

We hear these horrid stories (like the ones posted over the past couple of days on the forum) but ... are we talking about a few bad apples or a pervasive culture of racism or something in between?  This story, for example, as Wise Son points out, is out of the UK.  Do you all think racism was a factor in the police officers' fascination with this video, or is this story more of an example of the sick fascination some people have with viewing mutilation?  Or is it an example of the police dehumanizing criminals (irrespective of race)?

Whatever is going on here ... geeze ... what a way to start one's morning.  Gawd this is sickening.   :(

It's not just with the coppers there. I remember an earlier scandal where Afghan-based U.K. soldiers desecratied the bodies of Afghanis. Sticking the heads on pikes or something. I never understood why they'd do that. And in my first days of college many websites had Kurt Cobain's autopsy photos.
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Offline JLI Jesse

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2006, 07:42:18 am »
You have to remember, there are thousands of cops all over the country quietly doing a good job, but nobody reports on that.

Offline Wise Son

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2006, 07:48:59 am »
You have to remember, there are thousands of cops all over the country quietly doing a good job, but nobody reports on that.
Exactly. 'COP DOES JOB, NO ONE INJURED' is not a great headline.

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michaelintp

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2006, 08:20:25 am »
You have to remember, there are thousands of cops all over the country quietly doing a good job, but nobody reports on that.
Exactly. 'COP DOES JOB, NO ONE INJURED' is not a great headline.

Hahahahahaha!   :D

Offline Battle

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2019, 08:17:51 pm »
Sunday, 17th March 2019
Virginia woman handcuffed behind her back committed suicide by shooting herself through mouth: police
by Kate Feldman

A 19-year-old Virginia woman committed suicide by shooting herself through the mouth, despite having her hands handcuffed behind her back, according to the medical examiners office.

Sarah Wilson was a passenger in her boyfriends car when they were pulled over by Chesapeake police in July 2018, according to WAVY.

Officers arrested both Wilson and her boyfriend, 27-year-old Holden Medlin, and handcuffed her with her hands behind her back.

Medlin allegedly resisted arrest and tried to flee, at which point officers left Wilson to deal with him.

Wilson then allegedly took a gun out of the car, contorted her body and shot herself, Chesapeake Police Spokesman Leo Kosinski told WAVY in August.

Donna Price, the administrator of the chief medical examiner's Norfolk office, confirmed on Friday that Wilson had died by suicide after shooting herself in the mouth.

At the time of the incident, Kosinski said that one of the officers had been wearing a body cam, but that it was knocked offline during the struggle.

Medlin was arrested after the traffic stop and charged with possession of oxycodone, possession of suboxone, possession of paraphernalia, possession of a firearm with a schedule I or II drug, fleeing from a law enforcement officer and being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Police found 11 oxycodone, a syringe, drug paraphernalia, a rifle and several boxes of ammunition in his car. He had also swallowed a golf ball-sized bag of an unknown substance.





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https://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/ny-news-handcuffed-woman-suicide-20190317-story.html

Offline Battle

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2019, 07:05:01 am »
Thursday, 6th September 2018
IBM Used NYPD Surveillance Footage to Develop Technology That Lets Police Search by Skin Color
by George Joseph & Kenneth Lipp

In the decade after the 9/11 attacks, the New York City Police Department moved to put millions of New Yorkers under constant watch.

Warning of terrorism threats, the department created a plan to carpet Manhattans downtown streets with thousands of cameras and had, by 2008, centralized its video surveillance operations to a single command center.

Two years later, the NYPD announced that the command center, known as the Lower Manhattan Security Coordination Center, had integrated cutting-edge video analytics software into select cameras across the city.

The video analytics software captured stills of individuals caught on closed-circuit TV footage and automatically labeled the images with physical tags, such as clothing color, allowing police to quickly search through hours of video for images of individuals matching a description of interest.

At the time, the software was also starting to generate alerts for unattended packages, cars speeding up a street in the wrong direction, or people entering restricted areas.

Over the years, the NYPD has shared only occasional, small updates on the programs progress.

In a 2011 interview with Scientific American, for example, Inspector Salvatore DiPace, then commanding officer of the Lower Manhattan Security Initiative, said the police department was testing whether the software could box out images of peoples faces as they passed by subway cameras and subsequently cull through the images for various unspecified facial features.

While facial recognition technology, which measures individual faces at over 16,000 points for fine-grained comparisons with other facial images, has attracted significant legal scrutiny and media attention, this object identification software has largely evaded attention.

How exactly this technology came to be developed and which particular features the software was built to catalog have never been revealed publicly by the NYPD.

Now, thanks to confidential corporate documents and interviews with many of the technologists involved in developing the software, The Intercept and the Investigative Fund have learned that IBM began developing this object identification technology using secret access to NYPD camera footage.

With access to images of thousands of unknowing New Yorkers offered up by NYPD officials, as early as 2012, IBM was creating new search features that allow other police departments to search camera footage for images of people by hair color, facial hair, and skin tone.

IBM declined to comment on its use of NYPD footage to develop the software.

However, in an email response to questions, the NYPD did tell The Intercept that Video, from time to time, was provided to IBM to ensure that the product they were developing would work in the crowded urban NYC environment and help us protect the City.

There is nothing in the NYPDs agreement with IBM that prohibits sharing data with IBM for system development purposes.

Further, all vendors who enter into contractual agreements with the NYPD have the absolute requirement to keep all data furnished by the NYPD confidential during the term of the agreement, after the completion of the agreement, and in the event that the agreement is terminated.

In an email to The Intercept, the NYPD confirmed that select counterterrorism officials had access to a pre-released version of IBMs program, which included skin tone search capabilities, as early as the summer of 2012.

NYPD spokesperson Peter Donald said the search characteristics were only used for evaluation purposes and that officers were instructed not to include the skin tone search feature in their assessment.

The department eventually decided not to integrate the analytics program into its larger surveillance architecture, and phased out the IBM program in 2016.

After testing out these bodily search features with the NYPD, IBM released some of these capabilities in a 2013 product release.

Later versions of IBMs software retained and expanded these bodily search capabilities.

(IBM did not respond to a question about the current availability of its video analytics programs.)

Asked about the secrecy of this collaboration, the NYPD said that  various elected leaders and stakeholders were briefed on the departments efforts to keep this city safe, adding that sharing camera access with IBM was necessary for the system to work.

IBM did not respond to a question about why the company didnt make this collaboration public.

Donald said IBM gave the department licenses to apply the system to 512 cameras, but said the analytics were tested on fewer than fifty.

He added that IBM personnel had access to certain cameras for the sole purpose of configuring NYPDs system, and that the department put safeguards in place to protect the data, including non-disclosure agreements for each individual accessing the system; non-disclosure agreements for the companies the vendors worked for; and background checks.

Civil liberties advocates contend that New Yorkers should have been made aware of the potential use of their physical data for a private companys development of surveillance technology.

The revelations come as a city council bill that would require NYPD transparency about surveillance acquisitions continues to languish, due, in part, to outspoken opposition from New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and the NYPD.











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https://theintercept.com/2018/09/06/nypd-surveillance-camera-skin-tone-search/

Offline Battle

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Re: Are Police Disrespectful?
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2019, 04:32:05 am »
Tuesday, 16th April 2019
Supreme Court declines to hear case of rapper whose lyrics were threatening to police
by Kia Morgan-Smith


The U.S. Supreme Court has decided not to take up Pennsylvania rapper Jamal Knoxs case to determine if his lyrics making terrorist threats against two law enforcement officers was protected by the First Amendment, CNN reports.

Knox was found guilty in a nonjury trial and a state appeals court upheld the conviction, ruling that the lyrics were not protected by the First Amendment because they crossed a threshold known as the true threat doctrine, according to the Gainesville Sun.

In the Knox song, he says, Lets kill these cops cuz they dont do us no good, and then he names two officers, the Gainesville Sun reports.

Knoxs case caught the eye of prominent rap artists Killer Mike, Chance the Rapper, Meek Mill, Yo Gotti, Fat Joe and 21 Savage who filed a legal brief in March in support of Knox saying that the song F*** the Police is a political statement that no reasonable person familiar with rap music would have interpreted as a true threat of violence.

At issue is the rap video on YouTube called F**k the Police,  by Knox (rap name Mayhem Mal of the Ghetto Superstar Committee), made in 2012 that directly named two officers, Daniel Zeltner, and Michael Kosko, and included photos of the cops.

The song also referenced Richard Poplawski, a man on death row for killing three Pittsburgh police officers.

Knox and his friend Rashee Beasley uploaded the video to a YouTube and a public Facebook page while they had pending drug and weapons charges as a result of being arrested by the two officers named in the song.

Once the video was released, they were charged with terroristic threats and intimidation.


In one of the lyrics, they rap:

Lets kill these cops cause they dont do us no good.

While free speech is protected by the Constitution, last year the court determined that Knoxs song was threatening to police and highly personalized and therefore is not protected.


The Supreme Court wont be addressing this issue, at least for now.



















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https://thegrio.com/2019/04/16/supreme-court-declines-to-hear-case-of-rapper-whose-lyrics-were-threatening-to-police/
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 05:04:02 am by Battle »