Poll

Does Barry Bonds use steriods?

definately
4 (50%)
possibly
1 (12.5%)
rarely
0 (0%)
absolutely not
0 (0%)
Who doesn't
3 (37.5%)

Total Members Voted: 8

Voting closed: August 30, 2006, 11:08:14 am

Author Topic: Barry Bonds  (Read 7013 times)

Offline Curtis Metcalf

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 4499
  • One never knows, do one?
    • View Profile
You can't discuss Bonds without race
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2007, 12:50:56 pm »
Todd Boyd, the Notorious Ph. D weighs in on Barry:

You can't discuss Bonds without race
By Todd Boyd
Special to Page 2

On April 4, 1974, Opening Day for a new season, baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn and vice president Gerald Ford were in attendance at the Cincinnati Reds' home opener against the Atlanta Braves to witness Hank Aaron attempt to tie Babe Ruth's celebrated home run record. This record was held by the most beloved figure in the history of the game, and it was also a record that many felt would never be broken.

As Aaron got closer and closer, it became clear that it was only a matter of when, not if, the record book would be altered to accommodate the new home run king. Considering the iconic status that Ruth held in the game's history, the fact that baseball had been integrated a mere 37 years before and the lingering feelings of racial animosity that still existed in the decade immediately following the civil rights movement in America, many were not too happy with the fact that Aaron, a black man, would be displacing their beloved Babe at the top of the home run chart.

On April 4 six years earlier, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had been assassinated on the balcony of a Memphis motel. Aaron had asked the Reds organization if they would honor the sixth anniversary of Dr. King's death with a moment of silence before the game started. The Reds refused to do so. Aaron, on his first swing of the new season, tied the record anyway. Four nights later, Aaron went on to break the record in front of his home crowd in Atlanta.

As Aaron approached the record, he started to get something like 3,000 letters a day in the mail. Most of those letters were hate mail of one sort or another, many even containing death threats. Aaron now traveled with an armed police officer for his own protection. At the peak of his sports life, a time when a man should be feeling nothing short of the unabashed joy that accompanies a major accomplishment like this, Hank Aaron could not fully enjoy the moment because he had to be concerned that he might actually lose his own life, simply for hitting a baseball.

Race is once again an issue in Barry Bonds' quest for baseball's home run record, even though MLK's birthday is now a national holiday and we are some 33 years removed from Aaron's historic feat. Many things have changed since that April night in Atlanta, not the least of which is the fact that Barry Bonds is admittedly a far less sympathetic figure than the man he is chasing on the all-time home run list.

A recent ESPN/ABC News poll suggests there is a racial divide in the nation around people's attitude towards Bonds and his attempt to set the new home run mark. In the last few years, we have been treated to grand jury investigations, congressional hearings and best-selling books, all of which have placed Bonds at the center of a much bigger steroid controversy in baseball. This being the case, in spite of all the speculation to the contrary, it has never been proven that Bonds is guilty of using performance-enhancing drugs.

There has long been a notion among certain members of the African-American community that once a successful black person manages to make it to the top of his respective field, there is a vested interest among other people outside of the community to see this person fall. Barry Bonds is only the most recent example of such a notion. The vehemence with which these outside forces seem aligned in their interest to go after Bonds has helped to fuel such thinking.

Many others feel that the situation is plain and simple; they believe Bonds cheated and should be punished. Again, this is despite the fact that Bonds has never been caught using steroids. This racial divide reveals different attitudes about crime and punishment, guilt and innocence in our society.

Complete article here.
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."

Offline JAXN

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 225
    • View Profile
Re: Barry Bonds
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2007, 02:50:53 pm »
I don't think he used roids, or at least not in the sense that they're trying to claim...if the argument is about his size, all i can say is my dad is alot bigger than what he was 20 years ago..this is a witch hunt, the media has never liked Bonds..he's never tested positive for roids, but you wouldn't know that by the media's comments. Ortiz made interesting comments about the issue, saying that alot of cats are supposedly taking roids in the league and they're nowhere near Bonds.. Does Barry take some kind of special roid?

But let's say he did..like Curtis said, it wouldn't be cheating because it wasn't against the rules of basebal.

Jenn

  • Guest
Re: Barry Bonds
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2007, 01:35:24 pm »
*sigh* I know he's probably going to break Hammerin' Hank's record and I know it has to happen sometime, but I am bitter about it being Barry.

Offline Reginald Hudlin

  • Landlord
  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9884
    • View Profile
Re: Barry Bonds
« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2007, 01:56:08 pm »
Todd Boyd did his damn thing on that one.

Offline bluezulu

  • HEF FOI
  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2409
    • View Profile
Re: Barry Bonds
« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2007, 02:50:56 pm »
I mean, if he did roids which I don't care if he did but come on the media is the last group that should say sh*t. They were giving Sosa and Mcguire verbal hand jobs and ignoring the obvious that they were roided out. The biggest superstar up to that time Bonds looked at them and was like wtf? So in the mind of the athlete if he did not take roids then dammit he wasn't trying hard enough. I am the last one that would blame individual's behavioral choices on others but this is a case when it is damn hard. Part of it is about who Barry is and the other part is about race. Just like other black men who are unapologetic on who they are as a man like our own Reggie Hudlin the media ie white guys hate that sh*T. You mean a black guy who does not give a damn about what the white man want they can't stand. So in the fact that they gloss over McGuire and others who were roiding it up and come after Bonds with the fire its racial.

We will all get a laugh after this chase is over and the bomb drops with all of the name of the precious ones who did take roids come out.

I hate to say it but I do respect the man but how the f*ck Cal Ripken Jr. Played all those games for all of those years at the level he did without roides or uppers. Come on yall. ::)

Offline Vic Vega

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 4140
    • View Profile
Re: Barry Bonds
« Reply #20 on: May 15, 2007, 11:21:42 am »
IT REALLY DOESN'T MATTER IF HE DID THEM OR NOT.

Prior to 2005(?) there was no prohibition against steroid use in baseball. Baseball's one golden rule has been no betting. That's it.

Pitchers have been going on the mound under the influence of speed (Bennies) at the very least for decades. No one seems to want to do anything about this.

When Sosa and McGuire were at the All Star game and were ripped like He-Man Action Figures everybody knew the deal then. Baseball chose to ignore it at the time. 

If they want to give him an asterisk, fine, that's fair. But a sport that features serial substance abusers (Billy Martin, Steve Howe, the 86' Mets and David Wells) really shouldn't look into the issue of performance alteration unless they are going to take it all the way.

Don't get me wrong, I have no use for Bonds whatsoever. I find all the hand wringing silly is all.     

Offline Catch22

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3112
  • You gots to have vision, Willie!
    • View Profile
    • PapiCatch22's Urban Suite
Re: Barry Bonds
« Reply #21 on: May 15, 2007, 11:27:21 am »
IT REALLY DOESN'T MATTER IF HE DID THEM OR NOT.

Prior to 2005(?) there was no prohibition against steroid use in baseball. Baseball's one golden rule has been no betting. That's it.

Pitchers have been going on the mound under the influence of speed (Bennies) at the very least for decades. No one seems to want to do anything about this.

When Sosa and McGuire were at the All Star game and were ripped like He-Man Action Figures everybody knew the deal then. Baseball chose to ignore it at the time. 

If they want to give him an asterisk, fine, that's fair. But a sport that features serial substance abusers (Billy Martin, Steve Howe, the 86' Mets and David Wells) really shouldn't look into the issue of performance alteration unless they are going to take it all the way.

Don't get me wrong, I have no use for Bonds whatsoever. I find all the hand wringing silly is all.     

I totally agree.  If it wasn't against their rules when he was doing them...then what's the fuss about?  When they became a banned substance, he stopped and he's still jackin' homers.  I'm not a Bonds fan...hell, I find baseball just about the most boring of the major sports, but I don't like witch hunts directed at one person.  You know it's a sad day for the sport when the only honest person you can count is Jose Canseco.