Author Topic: DJANGO UNCHAINED  (Read 68792 times)

Offline Hypestyle

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #60 on: December 24, 2012, 07:18:59 am »
Katt Williams said he was offered the title role first......................for some reason I don't believe him
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pyT389ndnqQ

wow, katt's melting down something fierce.. this has gone way beyond eccentric, it's just.. sad..
Be Kind to Someone Today.

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #61 on: December 24, 2012, 04:35:43 pm »
NEW YORK TIMES:

.December 24, 2012
Movie Review
The Black, the White and the Angry
By A. O. SCOTT
“It’s better than ‘Lincoln,’ ” my teenage daughter said, as the end credits rolled at a screening of Quentin Tarantino’s “Django Unchained.” She was teasing me — it’s a sad fact of my life that some of the people I’m fondest of do not seem to share my fondness for Steven Spielberg’s latest movie — but also suggesting an interesting point of comparison.

“Lincoln” and “Django Unchained,” the one a sober historical drama and the other a wild and bloody live-action cartoon, are essentially about different solutions to the same problem. You could almost imagine the two films, or at least their heroes, figuring in the kind of good-natured, racial-stereotype humor that used to be a staple of stand-up comedy (and was memorably parodied on “The Simpsons”): “white guys abolish slavery like this” (pass constitutional amendment); “but black guys, they abolish slavery like this” (blow up plantation).

A more substantive contrast might be drawn between the approaches of two filmmakers — both steeped in the history of popular cinema and both brilliant craftsmen whose skill inspires admiration, as well as a measure of suspicion — to a subject full of pain and fraught with peril. Mr. Spielberg, in his ambitious, history-minded projects, hews to the proud (though sometimes mocked) tradition of the Hollywood A picture, in which big themes are addressed with appropriately sweeping visual and emotional gestures. Mr. Tarantino finds inspiration in what are still frequently seen as less reputable genres and styles: Asian martial arts movies, spaghetti westerns, blaxploitation.

Not that you need, at this point, to choose. Among Mr. Tarantino’s achievements has been his successful argument that the maligned and neglected B movies of the past should be viewed with fresh eyes and unironic respect. His own tributes to the outlaw, outsider film tradition — flamboyant in their scholarly care and in their bold originality — have suggested new ways of taking movies seriously. “Django Unchained” is unabashedly and self-consciously pulpy, with camera moves and musical cues that evoke both the cornfed westerns of the 1950s and their pastafied progeny of the next decade. (The title comes from a series of Italian action movies whose first star, Franco Nero, shows up here in a cameo.) It is digressive, jokey, giddily brutal and ferociously profane. But it is also a troubling and important movie about slavery and racism.

As such, “Django Unchained” is obviously a companion to “Inglourious Basterds,” in which Mr. Tarantino had the audacity to turn the Nazi war against the Jews into the backdrop for a farcical, ultraviolent caper. He did not simply depart from the facts of history, inventing, in the title characters, a squad of mostly Jewish-American killers led by a United States Army lieutenant from Tennessee; he rewrote the past in the vivid, visceral language of film fantasy.

The point of “Inglourious Basterds” was not to engage in counterfactual speculation about a successful plot to kill Hitler, but rather to carry out a vicarious, belated and altogether impossible form of revenge, using the freedom of cinematic make-believe to even the score.

Like “Inglourious Basterds,” “Django Unchained” is crazily entertaining, brazenly irresponsible and also ethically serious in a way that is entirely consistent with its playfulness. Christoph Waltz, who played the charming, sadistic SS officer Hans Landa in “Basterds,” here plays Dr. King Schultz, a charming, sadistic German bounty hunter (masquerading as an itinerant dentist) whose distaste for slavery makes him the hero’s ally and mentor.

That hero, first glimpsed in shackles and rags on a cold Texas night in 1858, is Django (Jamie Foxx), who becomes Schultz’s sidekick and business partner. Schultz is an amoral gun for hire, tracking down fugitives and habitually choosing the first option offered in the formulation “Wanted: Dead or Alive.”

Over time the traditional roles of white gunslinger and nonwhite sidekick are reversed, as the duo’s mission shifts from Schultz’s work to the rescue of Django’s wife, Broomhilda (Kerry Washington). After the couple tried to run away from their former plantation together, they were whipped and branded (the horrific punishment is shown in flashback), and Broomhilda was sold.

Django and Schultz’s search for her leads them to Candyland, a Mississippi estate whose debonair master, Calvin Candie, is played with almost indecent flair by Leonardo DiCaprio. Candie is assisted in his savagery by Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson), a house slave who may be the most shocking invention in “Django Unchained.” He is an Uncle Tom whose servility has mutated into monstrosity and who represents the symbolic self Django must destroy to assert and maintain his freedom.

The plot is, by Mr. Tarantino’s standards, fairly linear, without the baroque chronology of “Pulp Fiction” or the parallel story lines of “Inglourious Basterds.” But the movie does take its time, and it wanders over a wide expanse of geographic and thematic territory.

In addition to Mr. Tarantino’s trademark dialogue-heavy, suspense-filled set pieces, there are moments of pure silliness, like a gathering of hooded night riders (led by Don Johnson), and a late escapade (featuring Mr. Tarantino speaking in an Australian accent) that perhaps owes more to Bugs Bunny than to any other cultural archetype.

Of course, the realm of the archetypal is where popular culture lives, and Mr. Tarantino does not hesitate to train his revisionist energies on some deep and ancient national legends. Like many westerns, “Django Unchained” latches onto a simple, stark picture of good and evil, and takes homicidal vengeance as the highest — if not the only — form of justice.

But in placing his story of righteous payback in the Old South rather than the Wild West, and in making its agent a black former slave, Mr. Tarantino exposes and defies an ancient taboo. With the brief and fascinating exception of the blaxploitation movies and a few other works of radical or renegade art, vengeance in the American imagination has been the virtually exclusive prerogative of white men. More than that, the sanctification and romanticization of revenge have been central to the ideology of white supremacy.

In “Regeneration Through Violence,” his classic study of the mythology of the frontier, from colonial times to the eve of the Civil War, the literary historian Richard Slotkin identifies two essential mythic figures: the captive, usually an innocent woman held against her will by ruthless and alien usurpers, and the hunter, who is obsessed with protecting her honor and, sometimes secondarily, securing her freedom. (“The Searchers,” with John Wayne as the hunter and Natalie Wood as the captive, is perhaps the most sophisticated modern version of this narrative.)

Broomhilda and Django certainly fit those roles, and yet the roles, historically, were not intended for them. Some abolitionist works like “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” could paint slavery as a form of captivity, but the canonical captives of antebellum American literature were white women kidnapped by Indians, who after the Civil War were often replaced by freed slaves as objects of superstitious terror. The idea that regenerative violence could be visited by black against white instead of the reverse — that a man like Django could fill out the contours of the hunter — has been almost literally unthinkable.

But think about that when the hand-wringing starts about “Django Unchained” and ask yourself why the violence in this movie will suddenly seem so much more problematic, so much more regrettable, than what passes without comment in “Jack Reacher” or “Taken 2.” Mr. Tarantino is a virtuoso of bloodshed, that is for sure, and also more enamored of a particularly toxic racial slur than any decent white man should be. But decency in the conventional sense is not his concern, though in another sense it very much is. When you wipe away the blood and the anarchic humor, what you see in “Django Unchained” is moral disgust with slavery, instinctive sympathy for the underdog and an affirmation (in the relationship between Django and Schultz) of what used to be called brotherhood.

So maybe it’s not so different from “Lincoln,” after all. And if “Django Unchained” is not better, it is arguably more radical, both as cinema and as (fanciful) history. A double feature might be just the thing, if you have five and a half hours to spare. By any means necessary!

“Django Unchained” is rated R (Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian). Grisly violence (both comical and horrible); vile language (ditto).


Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #62 on: December 24, 2012, 04:36:47 pm »
from CNN:

The comparison with "Lincoln" is irresistible -- the two films take place within five years of each other. One is grounded in assiduous historical research and offers a shrewd analysis of idealism and political pragmatism, while the other is pure fantasy. But it's the fantasy that truly rattles the chains of slavery, confronting not just the racist assumptions but also the economic power structure that underpinned it -- the paradoxes, hypocrisies and insidious evils that permitted the system to flourish for so long.

Unlike "Lincoln," "Django Unchained" affords room at the heart of its narrative for compelling and assertive African-American characters, both heroic (Foxx in the title role) and otherwise (Samuel L Jackson, memorably repellent as a house servant who has become his master's right-hand man and confidant).

'

At a time when so many of our movies aspire to be colorblind (but "urban" film remains largely ghettoized), "Django Unchained" dares to confront racism as a potent force and a moving target, discovering horror and also grotesque comedy in the niceties of Southern etiquette: the way a white landowner can maintain a black mistress, for instance, or tolerate the grumbling of a loyal servant, just so long as everyone knows he will have his dogs tear a runaway limb from limb. That may be the film's true subject, when you get right down to brass tacks: the vacuity of good manners, and the limits of tolerance.

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #63 on: December 24, 2012, 04:40:14 pm »
MSNBC:

Django Unchained is a heroic love story
Touré, @Toure
12:11 pm on 12/24/2012
(Rex Features via AP Images)
Django Unchained is a film about love. Three kinds of love, really.

There’s the romantic love that pulls together two of the main characters: Jamie Foxx’s Django who is willing to travel through hell and risk his life to save his wife, Kerry Washington’s Broomhilda. As he travels toward her, Hildi appears in his daydreams looking luminous and gorgeous. We rarely see Black love portrayed in a Hollywood film in this way — a Black knight in shining armor battling dragons to rescue his radiant queen.

There’s also the bromantic love between Django and his liberator/mentor Dr. King Schultz, played by Christoph Waltz, who leads Django on a physical journey from Texas to Mississippi, and a psychic journey from slave to master of bounty hunting. Schultz abhors slavery, but he comes to care deeply for Django and to love him in a brotherly way.

But the sort of love that is most powerful in the film is the self-love of Django. Foxx applies a sheen of nobility to the character from the second he is freed and begins moving through the air with his shoulders back and his head high, his dignity shining. In a repeated motif, Django rides into towns atop a horse, his body language singing of pride and strength, a sight that causes people to rear back in shock, unused to seeing a Black person cloaked in dignity. In this way Django moves through the film like a single beam of light piercing through the dark.

In a critical moment Leonardo DiCaprio’s slavemaster Calvin Candie points out that there are more Blacks than whites on his plantation and wonders, “Why don’t they kill us?” He explains via phrenology — Black brains are lesser — which is now obviously and hysterically false.

But he is actually close to the truth. The answer isn’t in the brain, it’s in the mind. The colonized mind trapped in a white supremacist world; a world that believes in and is structured around the myth of Black intellectual inferiority.

Even when Candie is outsmarted by one of his slaves who must explain to Candie that he’s being played for a fool, his certainty in white intellectual superiority goes unchallenged. Early on, Django excises white supremacy from his mind and eventually destroys white supremacy in his tiny corner of the world. Yes, white supremacy relates to a national (if not global) matrix that no one man could conquer. There’s no telling what could happen to Django after the screen fades to black. But his self-love propels him through the universe of this film, making him heroic before he even begins killing slavemasters.

Django is heroic not just for rescuing his wife but also for spreading justice by putting slavemasters in the grave. It’s honestly baffling to me that smart people could find Django’s slavemaster killings as anything other than heroic. The moral calculus between slave and master is clear and unambiguous. The slave, cinematic or real, who doesn’t want to kill his master may be psychotic and still in the grip of white supremacy.

Killing a slavemaster does not reduce the slave to the slavemaster’s moral level. Nothing short of becoming a slavemaster could do that. Murder is the only fitting punishment and given the generations-long pain and chaos that slavery had and would cause, for a slavemaster to die only once is to get off easy.

For the descendants of slaves, who live in a world still tangibly doused in slavery’s residue, watching Django kill his oppressors could possibly feel cathartic. If murder can ever be morally justified by the presence of clear, undiluted, sustained evil — and I believe it can — then it is justified when a slave kills a master.

It’s also justified when a Jew kills a Nazi, which of course was at the heart of Tarantino’s previous revisionist revenge fantasy. A smart man in a green room at NBC posited that Kill Bill works in similar fashion as a revenge fantasy where a woman gets back at a patriarchal figure after near death in a scene akin to domestic violence or perhaps an honor killing. So then Django marks the third time Tarantino gives us people from outside the demographic power structure getting deadly revenge on white male oppressors.

There are those who have been anxiously hesitant about seeing Django, or have outright refused to see it, presumably because it was made by a non-Black filmmaker and one who has shown a love of Black culture that for some has been off-putting or raised suspicions about his “true intentions.”

These people may miss out on a delicious scene where Django whips a master in slow-motion or the hilarious scene where Tarantino destroys a Klan forerunner group by reducing them to madcap parody because they literally cannot see through their hoods. They may miss an assault on white supremacy and a beautiful Black love story. To dismiss Tarantino because his aesthetic embraces — in a bearhug — Black culture because he feels Black culture is part of his cultural legacy is, to me, a bit precious.

Many find the worlds of, say, Woody Allen and Wes Anderson, uninteresting because Black people and culture barely enter into them. Tarantino is one of the few major filmmakers whose worldview fully includes Black people and Black culture. I wonder if some of the anger at Tarantino is discomfort with any white person dealing with Black culture. Or anger at Hollywood for not producing more Black films or Black filmmakers, which is definitely a problem and surely not Tarantino’s fault.

From the moment it was announced that Tarantino intended to do a film about slavery, many worried that he would somehow trivialize slavery. Far from that, we’ve gotten an unsparing look at its horrors, from Mandingo fighting to hot boxes to facial branding to brutal whipping to all sorts of frightening headgear. Tarantino applies none of his typical campiness to slavery, never backing away from showing it as a despicable evil and enjoying its destruction.

We also have, in Django, that rare Hollywood thing: a film about Black history where a Black person has agency and is central to shaping his or her destiny rather than playing the foil for a white person who proves they have character by helping a downtrodden Black person. We could arrange a three-day film festival filled with those. Django wouldn’t qualify. Schultz is Django’s liberator and teacher but over time Django becomes the leader of their duo and his journey remains central.

Some bristle at Tarantino’s copious use of the n-word in this film, and in his oeuvre, which is perhaps the least valuable or interesting discussion point for a film of this import.

Slavery is the real obscenity, not this word. Tarantino has made the n-word a significant part of his canon partly because it’s a major part of American history. The view that he (or no one) should ever use it is simplistic and reductive, and attempts to correct a difficult part of history by stuffing it in the ground.

I’m uncomfortable with lazy, colloquial usage. But within the world of art the word cannot be simply erased. It’s part of the American linguistic songbook.

Tarantino has surely taken far more liberties with it than any other filmmaker, but his usage can be broken down into three buckets. Mostly he has used it to further the characterization of a morally bankrupt white person. From the thugs of Reservoir Dogs to the slavemasters of Django, when white people in his movies use the n-word he is generally signaling that they’re racist and thus despicable.

Tarantino has also put the n-word in Black people’s mouths to signify that they’re “supercool.” In this way, he is building on the supposedly badass recontextualization of the word that the hiphop generation has made infamous. The third way Tarantino has used the n-word is a single-serving group: Jimmy from Pulp Fiction, played by the director, who has a Black wife and at least one Black professional gangster friend. He uses the n-word but not to seem morally bankrupt or cool. He is far from either. Is it just for a shocking, subversive laugh? Seems so.

In Django he never does that. He gives us masters dying at the hands of a freed slave on a mission to liberate his wife. I wonder if our ancestors would find that disrespectful.


Offline Battle

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #64 on: December 25, 2012, 06:10:24 pm »
The theater around my way where "Django" is playing is packed! ;D

Offline Magic Wand

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #65 on: December 25, 2012, 08:13:50 pm »
Y'all, the matinees were sold out round my way, so I sat through Les Mizz clenching my tix to the first Django showing of the evening.  Two extra-long films!  I would see each of them again.  Django was OUTSTANDING.
It was EVERYTHING I anticipated (Buck and the Preacher meets Inglorious Basterds) and then about 30 minutes MORE! 

Just.....WOW!
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Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #66 on: December 25, 2012, 08:42:09 pm »
Y'all, the matinees were sold out round my way, so I sat through Les Mizz clenching my tix to the first Django showing of the evening.  Two extra-long films!  I would see each of them again.  Django was OUTSTANDING.
It was EVERYTHING I anticipated (Buck and the Preacher meets Inglorious Basterds) and then about 30 minutes MORE! 

Just.....WOW!

Great to hear, Magic!

Offline Derrick

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #67 on: December 25, 2012, 09:53:23 pm »
DJANGO UNCHAINED
2012
Written and Directed by Quentin Tarantino
Produced by Reginald Hudlin, Stacy Sher and Pilar Savone

At the end of the day after we’ve finally put to bed all the complaints about Quentin Tarantino’s use of the word ‘nigger’, the stylized ultra-violence and placing the story of DJANGO UNCHAINED in the pre-Civil War, slavery infested American South ultimately it comes down to one thing: is DJANGO UNCHAINED a movie worth your time and money seeing? I think it is. And I recommend it highly. But you have to keep in mind that I’m a confirmed Quentin Tarantino fan and so I tend to overlook a lot of the flaws in his movies. And they do have flaws, as do all movies as there’s no such thing as a perfect movie. It’s just that Tarantino gets so many things right in his movies I’m totally willing to cut him much slack on those flaws. And I just love his attitude about making movies. He just goes ahead and puts it all out there, manically throwing in so many influences from so many things that you can’t rightly point at a Tarantino movie and say that it’s strictly a crime story or a revenge drama or a war movie. And in the case of DJANGO UNCHAINED it’s a spaghetti western, a comedy, a romantic quest, a revenge saga and a surprisingly honest look at slavery as it existed in the period before the Civil War. That honesty comes with a whole lot of brutality and pain and Tarantino doesn't turn away from it.

DJANGO UNCHAINED has nothing to do with the classic 1966 spaghetti western “Django” save that the protagonists share the name. There is a subtle passing of the torch in a nice little scene between Jamie Foxx and the original Django, Franco Nero himself but it’s not at all necessary to have seen the earlier movie. This new Django is a black man, a slave with no future save to work and die. But he’s given a new life when he is freed by Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz) a dentist turned bounty hunter. Schultz is hunting three men who have sizeable bounties on their heads. He’s never seen them before but Django has. Schultz makes a deal with Django who is frankly bewildered by this loquacious, articulate white man who treats him with respect and speaks to him as an equal. If Django helps him find the three men, he’ll give Django his freedom and part of the bounty money.

During the course of their hunt for the Brittle Brothers, Schultz teaches Django how to shoot and how to track men as he discovers that the ex-slave in his words is “born for this line of work” and shortly the two men are full partners in bounty hunting. Their friendship grows such a degree that Schultz agrees to help Django rescue his wife Brunhilde/Broomhilda (Kerry Washington) who was separated from her husband and sold to Calvin J. Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio) master of the fourth largest plantation in Mississippi, Candyland. Candyland is famous for the Mandingo fighters Candie trains and it’s by pretending that they are interested in buying one of his fighters that gets Django and Schultz inside Candyland. But due to the suspicious nature of Candyland’s majordomo Steven (Samuel L. Jackson) the partners may not make it out alive, much less accomplish their mission.

I have to admit again that I’m a sucker for the reckless operatic nature of any Tarantino film and DJANGO UNCHAINED is no different. It looks and feels like a big movie should and it has the acting power to back it up. And in addition, Tarantino has put away his toolbox of his usual stylistic visual effects to just tell his story and trust the strength of that story and the performances to back it up. Christoph Waltz I fell in love with five minutes into the movie. At first I thought it was a little risky for Tarantino to put the beginning of this film on his shoulders the way he did in “Inglourious Basterds” but Waltz quickly establishes that this is a totally different character and does it very well with a quirky edge that is both very funny and very dangerous.

Leonardo DiCaprio and Samuel L. Jackson appear to have some sort of private side bet to see who can out-ham the other in their scenes together and I mean that in the best possible way. They’re having fun with the material and their characters and it shows in their outstanding performances. I’ve never been much of a Jamie Foxx fan but I liked his performance a lot here. His transformation from raggedy slave to professional bounty hunter to avenging angel is thrilling to watch. And I thought it really refreshing to have as a protagonist an heroic black man who is motivated by the love he has for his wife and wants her back. It gives the movie an emotional core that puts it on a level above a simple revenge or hunt for gold plot.

If there’s anything in the movie I can point to and go, “say wha now?” it’s Kerry Washington’s performance in the movie. Not that it’s a bad one. Or even a good one as there simply isn’t enough there for me to say one way or another. Considering that it’s her character’s plight that gets the story going, Kerry Washington has surprisingly few lines and even fewer scenes. Oh, trust me when I say that she works with what she’s been given but it just struck me as odd that more wasn’t done with her character.

What else? There’s the parade of familiar and not so familiar faces in the movie. I didn’t recognize Lee Horsley, Tom Wopat, Robert Carradine, Tom Savini or James Remar. But I did recognize Dennis Christopher, Bruce Dern, Walton Goggins and James Russo. And I most certainly did recognize Don Johnson and Jonah Hill in an absolutely side-splitting scene  involving The Klan and a discussion about the proper way to cut eyeholes in a hood that is hilarious enough to be worthy of Mel Brooks.

Two more things and I’ll let you get back to what you were doing. The language is extremely raw and graphic and ‘nigger’ is used freely, often and by every member of the cast. If you are offended by the word then I strongly urge you to give the movie a pass. However, if you can accept the usage of the word considering the period of American history the movie is set in as one where the word was used commonly, fine. Mind you, I’m not condoning or condemning the use of the word. But I do consider it my duty as a reviewer of the movie to inform you that the word is used and used a LOT.

The violence. I’d heard a lot about the violence in DJANGO UNCHAINED and maybe I’ve become desensitized due to all the violent movies I’ve seen but I actually didn’t see anything in DJANGO UNCHAINED I hadn’t seen before. The gunfights are obviously inspired by Peckinpah’s “The Wild Bunch” and there are some grisly scenes of mayhem and torture that actually could have been worse if Tarantino had lingered on them. But he stays on the shot just long enough for you to get the idea and then he cuts away to let your imagination fill in the rest.

So should you see DJANGO UNCHAINED? Chances are that if you’re a Quentin Tarantino fan you’ll already made up your mind to see it and if you’re not then I doubt anything I’ve said here will change your mind. But for me, it’s another home run for him. Quentin Tarantino hasn’t yet made a movie I haven’t enjoyed and I immensely enjoyed DJANGO UNCHAINED.

Rated R
165 minutes

 

Offline Lion

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #68 on: December 25, 2012, 10:44:35 pm »
Just got back from it. I didn't think I was going to be able to see it until the weekend, but I couldn't wait and I'm glad I did.

All I gotta say is... yes.

Offline sherelled

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #69 on: December 25, 2012, 11:39:56 pm »
  I tried going to Django  after dinner in the Promenade (Santa Monica CA) for those that don't know..and it was freakin' sold out.Damn Gina! I will see it don't worry.  :D Crowd mostly Caucasian down there. Thought that of all places there would be a chance to get in. Unlike Baldwin Hills or Fox Hill.
However when I googled the number one box office hit the "Hobbit" shows #1 for the weekending December 23rd. What's up with that? I am not versed on the day of the week when movie box office statistics are tallied but these MF's skew $#!& in their favor all of the time. I am not saying this is the case but If I go to a movie early evening after dinner and the line is wrapped around the corner. No tickets left for that show. And the other show doesn't begin until 10 something and its damn near sold out. Some body some where needs to acknowledge this movie at number one . I am going to see in the morning what these news people say. Mr. Hudlin your timing was impeccable. Everyone wants to see a good movie who isn't worn out by the kids and the Christmas thing. Christmas day just as good a day as any.I think I will go Friday or Saturday to get the weekend statistics up.  ;)\


Offline BmoreAkuma

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #70 on: December 26, 2012, 04:16:11 am »
  I tried going to Django  after dinner in the Promenade (Santa Monica CA) for those that don't know..and it was freakin' sold out.Damn Gina! I will see it don't worry.  :D Crowd mostly Caucasian down there. Thought that of all places there would be a chance to get in. Unlike Baldwin Hills or Fox Hill.
However when I googled the number one box office hit the "Hobbit" shows #1 for the weekending December 23rd. What's up with that? I am not versed on the day of the week when movie box office statistics are tallied but these MF's skew $#!& in their favor all of the time. I am not saying this is the case but If I go to a movie early evening after dinner and the line is wrapped around the corner. No tickets left for that show. And the other show doesn't begin until 10 something and its damn near sold out. Some body some where needs to acknowledge this movie at number one . I am going to see in the morning what these news people say. Mr. Hudlin your timing was impeccable. Everyone wants to see a good movie who isn't worn out by the kids and the Christmas thing. Christmas day just as good a day as any.I think I will go Friday or Saturday to get the weekend statistics up.  ;)\
I mean seriously? You're going to ask a question like that? For real? This is a prequel to LOTR of course it is going to be the number one movie of the week.

I havent seen the film yet but I am interested in Django
With these choices, I felt that the American black man only needed to choose which one to get eaten by; the liberal fox or the conservative wolf because both of them will eat him.

Offline Magic Wand

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #71 on: December 26, 2012, 04:41:21 am »
I saw Django with my mom.  It's rare that we like the same movies.  Django, she loved as much as I did.  She was actually cheering with the rest of the audience!  In the car on the way home, she wondered aloud about the "coincidental" timing of Roots on BET just before the opening of Django.
She'd been angry at white folks all week.  Now I reckon she's just gonna laugh at them.
"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." --Aristotle, Greek philosopher

Доверяй, но проверяй

Offline Mastrmynd

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #72 on: December 26, 2012, 08:09:29 am »
I saw Django with my mom.  It's rare that we like the same movies.  Django, she loved as much as I did.  She was actually cheering with the rest of the audience!  In the car on the way home, she wondered aloud about the "coincidental" timing of Roots on BET just before the opening of Django.
She'd been angry at white folks all week.  Now I reckon she's just gonna laugh at them.


It's done all of the time Magic. TV (cable and network) will show programming similar (or previous sequels) to the "BIG MOVIE" that's coming out that week. I think it was very smart of BET to do that.


Listen to my entertaining radio show, "The Takeover: Top 20 Countdown" at www.top20takeover.VVCRadio.com.

Right on to the real and death to the fakers!  Peace out!

Offline Battle

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #73 on: December 26, 2012, 10:36:56 am »
Dropped the teenaged girls off at the show last night and they came back with comments like,

"That movie was off da chain!!!"

"That movie was funny!"

"It was good!"

Offline TripleX

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Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
« Reply #74 on: December 26, 2012, 11:16:48 am »
I just saw it and loved it. Part of me wants to put my critique up here, but I don't want to because Mr. Hudlin was a producer and I'm reluctant to say anything negative about it. So that leaves Millarworld...but I don't want to criticize the movie on a white site amongst mixed company either.

Bump it, I'll just say what I've got to say. That's NOT Black folks. Sure Django was a great fantasy but at it's core it rang hollow. I read the Newsweek article wherein QT and Mr. Hudlin discussed their reaction to a scene in "Roots" where a slave is given the opportunity to beat his master and declines. It was said that the idea of that was ludicrous, but I don't think it was.

Django Unchained was mostly what a white person thinks a Black person's response to slavery would be.  As a whole we're not that blood thirsty and violent, even in the face of the atrocities of slavery. We're seekers of justice, not vengeance. That's why throughout antiquity incidence of Black people rising up to slay our white oppressors are few and far between. It's not because our brains are created in such a way as to make us naturally subservient, we're just better people.

With that said I still loved it. My favorite part was when one of the caged slaves looked at Django like he was Tupac and smiled.  This was the same brother that hated Django's arrogance, status and freedom the day before, but when the opportunity came for him to throw him under the bus he instead told the truth, thereby giving Dejango his freedom back and as a result his own. It was a beautiful moment of solidarity that undid the fervent nastiness of Samuel L. Jackson's character. It was great, the Alexandre Dumas part was too.

The entire film was more than worthy of the excited cheers and applause that erupted at it's end. The predominately Black audience in the theater I attended was ecstatic. I'm glad it was a hit and I can't wait for the sequel. The woman slaver with her face covered by a scarf was noticeably absent during the bloodshed at the movie's climax. She was a Tarantino sequel villain if there ever was one